fakebookMet lots of really nice people at my little social media presentation for the Chamber Music America folks at St. Peter’s yesterday.   As promised, here’s the slide deck I used.  If there is anything you’d like more information about, send me an email and I’ll try to answer.  My thanks to the extraordinarily well-organized CMA program director Susan Dadian for inviting me and for being the kind of gal who will quietly tell you that your fly is unzipped before you begin your talk.

10 Responses to “Faking It on 54th”
  1. Your PowerPoint slides are a great intro to social media – thanks for posting. Good crowd?

  2. Jerry Bowles says:

    Yes, thanks, Paul. It was a small room but it was filled and nobody left before the end which is always a good sign.

  3. We attendees didn’t even allow ourselves to be driven out by the disgruntled yet talkative dinosaurs in the room. Great talk, thanks!

  4. Elli Fordyce says:

    Hi Jerry:

    Thanks for the opportunity to put a few more brain cells to work on social media stuff. Toying with it for a couple of years and most hay made from Twitter, which suits my short attention span and ol’ Word Processor mentality. Today I got this Google Alert which I immediately tweeted and is getting RTs: http://bit.ly/corWPj, and many of the items on this Posterious (learned about on Twitter) post came from folks met on Twitter (did I mention I like Twitter?): http://ellifordyce.posterous.com/compilation-of-ellis-2009-press

    I’m at ellifordyce@msn.com, if I can be of help to anyone with Twitter and other things mentioned above.

    Best,

    Elli

  5. Walt Ribeiro says:

    Good slide, but I totally disagree with the “Follow people on Twitter, so they follow you back. And if they don’t, then dump them, and follow other people.”

    You don’t get followers by following other people, you get followers by creating good content that people are attracted to you for, and then build the authentic relationship form there.

    Otherwise, great Powerpoint!

  6. Steve Layton says:

    Great content is… well, great! If all you post is boring it doesn’t matter how many people initially follow, because they’ll just end up eventually dropping you. But I think Jerry has a point. It can be as simple as that to build a base — follow someone and often their natural response is to follow you back. From there its up to you to keep giving them a reason to follow.

  7. Jerry Bowles says:

    Hi, Walt. I think you represent the “purist” view of Twitter while being a marketer by trade (all you folks thought I was getting rich from Sequenza21, I bet) I’m more on the on the “mercenary’ side. I manage a dozen Twitter accounts for myself and others and I use it only to drive traffic to blogs. I’m not interested in building personal relationships and I’m still not convinced that anyone can really supply meaningful “content” in 140 characters. As an opt-in mailing list, Twitter is great but it is only useful for my purposes if people follow back. My experience is that if they don’t follow in a week they aren’t going to so I replace them with others who might follow rather than try to convince them that they’re missing something really cool. My cynical view is that there are two kinds of people on Twitter; those who want to sell you something now and those who are being nice to you so they can try to sell you something later.

  8. Kendra Shank says:

    Thanks, Jerry, for a very informative presentation. I would love to download the info from your slides, but don’t have Power Point. Is it available in any other format?

  9. Christian says:

    Jerry,

    This is a terrific primer. Thanks so much for sharing it!

  10.