Sunday, April 10th @ 7pm

REDCAT, the Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater, Los Angeles, CA

The EAR Unit, Los Angeles’ fearless new music ensemble, performs David Dvorin‘s “As Alice” with live electro-acoustic manipulations of tea cups, saucers, playing cards, clocks, doors, cats, dogs, baby sneezes and children’s voices along with interactive video. In special coordination with REDCAT, the Los Angeles premiere will feature an immersive performance of the twenty-five minute new work by the trio (violin, piano, electronic percussion), which includes specially mixed surround sound, and visuals projected onto 8 foot suspended spheres.

“As Alice” uses Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to reflect upon a series of childhood situations or acts of imaginative play with both aural and visual references. The electro-acoustic score was created solely from recorded sounds chosen because of their association with the Alice story, and include recorded conversations with Dvorin’s six year-old daughter. All of the collected sounds (including voice) were manipulated, processed, and ultimately used as fodder for invented (or imagined) instruments that are performed live by the percussionist in conjunction with the violin and piano.

Dvorin collaborated with Switzerland-based visual designer Ted Davis on the creation of interactive visual elements that are projection mapped onto large spherical objects situated around the performers. The raw visual material consists of both Cecil Hepworth’s age-deteriorated 1903 film of Alice in Wonderland, as well as whimsical illustrations drawn by Dvorin’s young daughter. Similar to the music, these images are also processed, triggered, and controlled by the musicians interactively, and react to their performance.

From the composer:

“I strongly feel that imaginative play is the source of all creativity in our lives. As children we relish the pleasures of pretending to be something we’re not, visiting a fabricated universe, constructing ‘rules’ and situations with which to interact, and ultimately transcending oneself, if just for a moment, in play. I recognize these same thrills when composing music: pretending, fabricating, constructing and hopefully transcending. Perhaps that is why I am still in love with children’s literature, whimsy, and nonsense. We are “as Alice”, exploring the fantastical without asking “why”; in imagination, dreaming and waking have no delineation.”

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