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ECCE in performanceWHAT: KINETICS | A Performance by Ecce Ensemble
WHEN: Friday, May 6th at 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: Le Laboratoire, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge, MA, 02142 T: Red to Kendall Square
TICKETS: $22/$11 Students. To purchase, contact Le Laboratoire at 617.945.7515 or visit LeLaboratoireCambridge.com.

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As the 2015-16 contemporary music ensemble-in-residence at Cambridge’s Le Laboratoire, the Ecce Ensemble completes its season with a diverse program of new chamber works by six emerging compositional voices. Inspired by Le Lab’s current Random International installation, 150 Millisecondsthe concert’s repertoire evokes a panoply of physical and psychological states both human and seemingly otherworldly. Performed by seven-member Ecce Ensemble and special guest vocalist Amanda DeBoer Bartlett, the program includes the world premiere of Already Root by Maxwell Dulaney, New England premieres by Erin Gee, Hillary Zipper, and Anna-Louise Walton, as well as works by Ecce’s executive director John Aylward, and the winner of Ecce’s 2016 International Call for Scores, Nuno Costa. 

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Van Cliburn Competition Gold Medalist Stanislav Iodenitch

Van Cliburn Competition Gold Medalist Stanislav Iodenitch

Van Cliburn Competition Gold Medalist Stanislav Iodenitch, a piano virtuoso hailed for playing with “laserlike clarity” (The Boston Globe), performs Tchaikovsky’s iconic Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Young Artists Symphony Orchestra, led by Artistic Director Alexander Treger, in a free concert capping the orchestra’s highly successful inaugural season on Sunday, May 1, 2016, 6 pm, at UCLA’s Royce Hall. The all-Russian program also includes Tchaikovsky’s enthralling Suite from Swan Lake and Lyadov’s Kikimora, a tone poem about a malicious spirit from Russian folklore. Additionally, to celebrate the conclusion of its first season, YASO is hosting a separate ticketed post-concert soiree, featuring a buffet dinner and jazz performances by Nigel Armstrong, former concertmaster under Treger, Julian Zheng, YASO principal horn, and other YASO artists.

“Stanislav Iodenitch is a remarkable artist,” says Treger. “We are thrilled to present him as a guest soloist with the Young Artists Symphony Orchestra to close our first season. To see one of the world’s leading pianists perform one of his signature works live in a free concert is a rare opportunity. We encourage people of all ages to attend since it promises to be a very special musical evening.”

Ioudenitch is widely regarded for his strong individuality and musical conviction. His artistry won him the Gold Medal at the 11th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, where he also took home the Steven De Groote Memorial Award for Best Performance of Chamber Music. Born in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, Ioudenitch has netted prizes at the Busoni, Kapell, Maria Callas and New Orleans competitions, among others. A former student of Dmitri Bashkirov, he also studied with Leon Fleisher, Murray Perahia, Karl Ulrich Schnabel, William Grant Naboré and Rosalyn Tureck at the International Piano Foundation in Como, Italy, the current International Piano Academy Lake Como. He subsequently became the youngest teacher ever invited to give master classes at the academy. Ioudenitch has collaborated with James Conlon, James DePreist, Günther Herbig, Asher Fisch, Stefan Sanderling, Michael Stern, Carl St. Clair and Justus Franz, and with such orchestras as the Munich Philharmonic, the National Symphony, the Rochester Philharmonic, the Honolulu Symphony and the National Philharmonic of Russia. He has also performed with the Takács, Prazák, Borromeo and Accorda quartets and is a founding member of the Park Piano Trio. He has appeared at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and the Forbidden City Concert Hall in Beijing and the Aspen Music Festival, among other venues and festivals. Ioudenitch’s recordings include Stanislav Ioudenitch, Gold Medalist, 11th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition for Harmonia Mundi and Trois Mouvements de Petrouchka produced by Thomas Frost. He also appeared in Playing on the Edge, Peter Rosen’s Peabody Award-winning PBS documentary about the 2001 Van Cliburn Competition and in the PBS Concerto series. In addition to Lake Como, he has led masterclasses at the Cliburn-TCU Piano Institute in Fort Worth, Stanford University, Cornell University, the National University in Seoul and Miami’s International Institute for Young Musicians.
Treger, former concertmaster of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, is “an icon of the Los Angeles musical scene” (LA Opus) whose conducting has been described as “vivid” (The New York Times), “uplifting” (Musical America) and “expertly finessed” (Examiner). He has guest-conducted the Turku Philharmonic in Finland and stepped in at the last minute to conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic, replacing the indisposed Franz Welser-Möst. He has also appeared as guest conductor with the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra, the New World Symphony, the Guangzhou Symphony Orchestra and the Russian State Academic Symphony Orchestra. As a soloist, he has performed with the San Francisco, Denver, Dallas and Houston symphonies, among many others. An avid chamber performer, Treger has collaborated with such well-known artists as Radu Lupu, Yefim Bronfman, André Previn, Bernard Greenhouse and Emanuel Ax. In addition to serving as YASO Artistic Director, the noted violinist, accomplished conductor and gifted educator also serves as the Music Director/Conductor of the Crossroads Chamber Orchestra.

YASO, hailed as a “glorious” (Out West Arts) “musical force to be reckoned with” (LA Opus), champions, mentors and inspires the next generation of outstanding young musicians for careers in classical music. The orchestra, comprised of dedicated young artists ages 15 to 26 drawn from a variety of schools and conservatories around the Southland, adheres to the high standards and protocols of professional orchestras, providing the orchestra members with the same type of experiences they will encounter as professional artists. YASO members, who receive a stipend for their services, are selected through a rigorous audition process. They perform key works that are an essential part of the core orchestral repertoire and are held to extremely high standards since many of the members will be auditioning directly into professional ensembles. During its inaugural 2015-16 season, YASO presents its final free concert of the season at Royce Hall on Sunday, May 1, 2016.

Admission to the concert is free, but reservations are recommended. Tickets to the post-concert soiree and dinner are $125. Reservations for both can be made at YASOLA.org or (310) 905-3496. Concert tickets are also available at the door the night of the concert on a space available basis.

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spectrumeavesdroppingtrans
Sunday, April 17, 7 PM

Spectrum
121 Ludlow Street, 2nd Floor

The Eavesdropping concert series at Spectrum kicks off its spring season and celebrates six years of activity with three performances at the price of one:
 
 
The New Thread Quartet presents a program of new saxophone quartet repertoire including the US premiere of “Ambience” by Ophir Ilzetzki for sax quartet and electronics; “Lucidity” by Monte Weber for soprano, saxophone quartet, and pre-recorded electronics, featuring soprano Alize Rozsnyai; “Mother Earth” by Erin Rogers for flute, saxophone quartet, and electronics, featuring Andrea Lee Smith on flute; and “Incantation S4-X” by Matthew Burtner for saxophone quartet and computer generated sound.

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Also on the program, Ken Filiano (bass) and Teodora Stepančić (piano) who join forces to perform Israeli composer Dganit Elyakim‘s “I Can Walk.”

Bonus track: the world premiere of composer Guy Barash‘s “Talkback VI” for trombone and electronics performed by trombone virtuoso William Lang.

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A reception will appropriately follow.

newthreadquartet.com
ophirilzetzki.com
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Filiano
teodora.stepancic.com
misscomposed.com
williamlang.org
guybarash.com

Tickets: $15/10 students and seniors
Available at the door or online

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Cellist Joshua Roman

Cellist Joshua Roman

Noted cellist and classical music innovator Joshua Roman hosts Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra’s engaging Baroque Conversations and solos on three of Bach’s six landmark suites for unaccompanied cello on Thursday, April 21, 2016, 7 pm, at Zipper Hall in downtown Los Angeles.  Bach’s Suite No. 3 in C major, Suite No. 2 in D minor, and Suite No. 6 in D major, performed by Roman, and the three other suites, are widely considered among the composer’s greatest works. Composed around 1720 and originally thought to be studies, the suites were largely unknown until famed cellist Pablo Casals became the first person to record all six, elevating their status so that they are now among the most popular and widely performed cello works ever written.

 

The concert is part of a two-week guest artist residency for the cellist that encompasses engagement with live and virtual audiences through pre-concert talks and personal introduction of the music from the stage; a guest appearance on LACO’s Orchestral Series on April 16, 8 pm, at Glendale’s Alex Theatre, and April 17, 7 pm, at UCLA’s Royce Hall; a cello masterclass at North Hollywood High on April 19; a special in-school program at Hoover Street Elementary School in Los Angeles on April 20; a free performance at Amoeba Music in Hollywood on April 20, 7 pm; an appearance with Orchestra members at the 6th Annual Hear Now Music Festival on April 23, 8 pm, at First Lutheran Church of Venice; a preview podcast and recording, including posting a short video from an iconic Southland location as part of Roman’s Everyday Bach series (www.youtube.com/user/JoshuaRomanCello).  Roman’s Guest Artist Residency with LACO is made possible, in part, by a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts.

 

 

Roman, “a cellist of extraordinary technical and musical gifts” (San Francisco Chronicle), is recognized as an accomplished composer, curator and programmer, particularly in his work as artistic director of Seattle Town Hall’s TownMusic series, with a vision to expand the classical music audience.  For his ongoing creative initiatives on behalf of classical music, Roman was named a 2011 TED Fellow, joining a select group of next generation innovators of unusual accomplishments who show potential to positively affect the world.  Before embarking on a solo career, Roman spent two seasons as principal cello of the Seattle Symphony, a position he won in 2006 at the age of 22.  This performance marks Roman’s second program with LACO in two weeks; he also joins LACO for the LA premiere of Mason Bates’s Cello Concerto April 16 and 17, 2016.

 

The enlightening five-concert Baroque Conversations series provides insight into the genesis of orchestral repertoire from early Baroque schools through the pre-classical period.  As host of the evening, Roman introduces the music from the stage and engages the audience in Q&A to conclude the concert.  A complimentary wine reception for all ticket holders begins at 6 pm.  Baroque Conversations concludes on Saturday, May 21, 2016, 8 pm, at USC’s Bovard Auditorium in partnership with the 2016 Piatigorsky International Cello Festival.  Baroque Conversations is generously sponsored by Carol & Warner Henry, a Friend of LACO and the Ronus Foundation.

 

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra is considered one of the world’s premier chamber orchestras as well as a pacesetter in presenting wide-ranging repertoire and adventurous commissions.  Its 2015-16 season, features a compelling mix of beloved masterpieces and genre-defying premieres from firmly established as well as notable up-and-coming composers programmed by Jeffrey Kahane, one of the world’s foremost conductors and pianists, who marks his 19th season as LACO’s music director.

 

Tickets, starting at $57, are available online at laco.org, or by calling LACO at 213 622 7001.  Single tickets can also be purchased at the venue box office on the night of the concert, if tickets remain.  Discounted tickets are available by phone for groups of 12 or more.  College students may purchase student rush tickets ($12), based on availability, at the box office an hour before the concert.

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YMF Debut Orchestra
Yuga Cohler, conductor & co-curator
Stephen Feigenbaum, arranger & co-curator

Music from Kanye West’s Yeezus paired with works by Beethoven, including
the Egmont Overture, Symphony No. 5 (op. 67), and String Quartet No. 14 (op. 131).

Saturday, April 16th, 2016 | 7:30 PM
Aratani Theatre
244 S. San Pedro St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

FREE Admission! No Tickets Required.
http://www.ymf.org/events

Watch the YEETHOVEN Trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRCywJaUEIE

YEETHOVEN Flyer 5.5x8.5

The Great Music Series explores the commonalities between the music of our times and classical masterpieces of the past. By highlighting the musical and cultural elements characteristic of all great music, the Series seeks to demonstrate that modern popular music is fundamentally similar to classical music. For its first installment, the series will compare Kanye West and Ludwig van Beethoven.

Kanye West is one of the most famous, albeit divisive, people alive in America. Since his debut solo album in 2004, West has become increasingly prominent as a producer, rap artist, and cultural activist. Today, he is unquestionably one of the most influential figures in popular music and culture. Considering his larger-than-life artistic personality, there is no better comparison to him than Beethoven, the apotheosis of the classical tradition.

M.C.’d by conductor Yuga Cohler and composer Stephen Feigenbaum, this concert will sonically illustrate the similarities between Kanye West’s latest album, Yeezus (orchestrated by Feigenbaum), and a variety of pieces by Beethoven. As the concert progresses, music by the two will become increasingly integrated, ultimately resulting in a total mash-up of the two. If you find this concert far-fetched, we invite you to come and listen – see if you can tell where Beethoven ends and Kanye begins.

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ECCE in performanceWHAT: KINETICS | A Performance by Ecce Ensemble
WHEN: Friday, May 6th at 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: Le Laboratoire, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge, MA, 02142
T: Red to Kendall Square
TICKETS: $22/$11 Students. To purchase, contact Le Laboratoire at 617.945.7515 or visit LeLaboratoireCambridge.com.

As the 2015-16 contemporary music ensemble-in-residence at Cambridge’s Le Laboratoire, the Ecce Ensemble completes its season with a diverse program of new chamber works by six emerging compositional voices. Performed by seven-member Ecce Ensemble and special guest vocalist Amanda DeBoer Bartlett, the program includes the world premiere of Already Root by Maxwell Dulaney, New England premieres by Erin Gee, Hillary Zipper, and Anna-Louise Walton, as well as works by Ecce’s executive director John Aylward, and the winner of Ecce’s 2016 International Call for Scores, Nuno Costa.

 

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Matthew Halls

Matthew Halls

Oregon Bach Festival Music Director Matthew Halls conducts the Los Angeles premiere of San Francisco-based composer Mason Bates’s first Cello Concerto, written for and performed by Joshua Roman, with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (LACO) on Saturday, April 16, 8 pm, at the Alex Theatre in Glendale, and Sunday, April 17, 2016, 7 pm at UCLA’s Royce Hall.  Bates’s piece, which highlights his sensibilities as composer-in-residence of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as well as a DJ, has been lauded as a tapestry of “classical lyricism and melody combining fluidly with blues, jazz elements, and techno rhythms that come straight from the 21st-century electronic club scene” (Classical Voice North America).  Halls also conducts Haydn’s popular Symphony No. 101 in D major, “The Clock,” and Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 1 in D major, “Classical,” both signature works of LACO’s repertoire.  Making his third LACO guest appearance, Halls has been heralded for his “ironclad command of the smallest details in the score” (Toronto Star).  Roman, making his LACO debut, was chosen a TED Fellow for his ongoing creative initiatives on behalf of classical music and is recognized as an accomplished composer, curator and programmer with a vision to expand the classical music audience.  He has been hailed as an “ascendant rock star of the cello world” (Seattle Post-Intelligencer).  Bates’ Cello Concerto was commissioned by Seattle Symphony Orchestra, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, and Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra.

 

The concert launches a two-week guest artist residency for Roman that encompasses engagement with live and virtual audiences through pre-concert talks; a cello masterclass at North Hollywood High on April 19; a special in-school program at Hoover Street Elementary School in Los Angeles on April 20; a free performance at Amoeba Music in Hollywood on April 20, 7 pm; a solo cello recital on LACO’s Baroque Conversations series on April 21, at 7 pm, at Zipper Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles; an appearance with Orchestra members at the 6th Annual Hear Now Music Festival on April 23, 8 pm, at First Lutheran Church of Venice; a preview podcast and recording, including posting a short video from an iconic Southland location as part of Roman’s Everyday Bach series (www.youtube.com/user/JoshuaRomanCello).  Roman’s Guest Artist Residency with LACO is made possible, in part, by a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts.

 

Roman is recognized as an accomplished composer, curator and programmer, particularly in his work as artistic director of Seattle Town Hall’s TownMusic series, with a vision to engage and expand the classical music audience.  Before embarking on a solo career, Roman spent two seasons as principal cello of the Seattle Symphony, a position he won in 2006 at the age of 22.  Since that time he has appeared as a soloist with the San Francisco, Seattle and New World symphonies; the Los Angeles Philharmonic; the BBC Scottish and Alabama symphony orchestras; the Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra and Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional del Ecuador.

 

Halls first came to prominence as a keyboard player and early music conductor but has become equally known for his dynamic and intelligent work with major symphony orchestras and opera companies, and for his probing and vibrant interpretations of music of all periods.  His many international engagements include the Cleveland and Salzburg Mozarteum orchestras, BBC Scottish and Frankfurt Radio symphonies, and the Seattle and Melbourne symphony orchestras.  The 2014 season marked his first as artistic director of the Oregon Bach Festival.  Halls’s recordings include a set of four Bach Harpsichord Con­certos (Linn Records) and Bach’s Easter and Ascension oratorios, as well as award-winning discs of Handel’s Parnasso in Festa (Hyperion) and Purcell’s Sonatas in Three and Four Parts.  Educated at Oxford University, Halls taught at the University for five years, and has held positions as artistic director of the King’s Consort and the Retrospect Ensemble, which he founded in 2009.  He is also passionately committed to education and working with young musicians.

 

Concert Preludes, pre-concert talks held one hour before curtain and free for ticket holders, provide insights into the program’s music and artists.  Cellist Joshua Roman will be a featured speaker.

 

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra is considered one of the world’s premier chamber orchestras as well as a pacesetter in presenting wide-ranging repertoire and adventurous commissions.  Its 2015-16 season, features a compelling mix of beloved masterpieces and genre-defying premieres from firmly established as well as notable up-and-coming composers programmed by Jeffrey Kahane, one of the world’s foremost conductors and pianists, who marks his 19th season as LACO’s music director.

 

Steinway is the official piano of Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra.

 

Tickets, starting at $27, are on sale now and may be purchased online at laco.org or by calling LACO at 213 622 7001.  Discounted tickets are also available by phone for seniors 65 years of age and older and groups of 12 or more.  College students may purchase student rush tickets ($12), based on availability, at the box office the day of the concert.  Also available for college students is the $30 “Campus to Concert Hall All Access Pass” – good for all seven of LACO’s Orchestral series concerts, Discover Bach’s Cantata “Sleepers Awake” and three Westside Connections concerts.

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LAMC Artistic Director Grant Gershon

LAMC Artistic Director Grant Gershon

The Los Angeles Master Chorale (LAMC), led by Artistic Director Grant Gershon, transforms Walt Disney Concert Hall into a festive banquet hall in the ancient Persian city of Persepolis for two immersive performances of eminent director Trevore Ross’s semi-staged production of Handel’s Alexander’s Feast, created for the LA Master Chorale to launch its multi-year “Hidden Handel” project on Saturday, April 16, 2 pm, and Sunday, April 17, 2016, 7 pm.

 

The “Hidden Handel” project comprises semi-staged/multimedia productions of five of the composer’s great but underrepresented oratorios performed in collaboration with some of the performing art world’s leading directors and artists.  “There are many beautiful and brilliant choral works composed by Handel that are not called Messiah,” says Gershon, referring to Handel’s most famous oratorio that has been performed by the LA Master Chorale numerous times.  “I’m very excited to introduce audiences to these incredible yet rarely performed masterworks.  Alexander’s Feast will be the perfect starter in a series that explores Handel’s vivid imagination and understanding of human nature through ‘The Power of Music.’”

 

Alexander’s Feast celebrates music’s power and ability to elicit and manipulate emotions.  The story follows Alexander the Great, having just conquered the ancient city of Persepolis, as he hosts a great banquet alongside his mistress Thais to celebrate their victory.  Timotheus, a traveling musician, possesses an uncanny knack for arousing a full spectrum of emotions within Alexander and his guests through his music, ultimately persuading Alexander to burn down the city in revenge for the loss of his soldiers killed in battle.  This prompts St. Cecilia, the patron saint of music herself, to descend to earth and calm the fury.


Tickets range from $29 – $129.  Group rates are available.  For tickets and information, please call (213) 972-7282, or visit www.lamc.org.  Tickets can also be purchased in person in advance at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Box Office (Mon-Sat, 10 am-6 pm) and at the Walt Disney Concert Hall Box Office on concert days starting 2 hours prior to the performance.  The Walt Disney Concert Hall is located at 111 South Grand Avenue at First Street in downtown Los Angeles.

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ZT Wall credit Irina Mednik

An atypical combination of instruments (clarinet, violin and piano) the Zodiac Trio formed in 2006 at the Manhattan School of Music, before becoming the first American group to be accepted to the Paris Conservatory’s chamber music program with the Ysaÿe Quartet. Since, the trio became the new image of the clarinet-violin-piano instrumentation, and maintains a consistently international touring schedule. The Zodiac Trio is paving the way for new generations of compositions for this unusual grouping by commissioning and performing new works, with over 100 works written for the ensemble.

 
The program at Spectrum on March 26 features the world premiere of John McDonald’s Trio about Smoking, written especially for the trio. Cast in three brief movements, the piece is both an ode to musician/smokers’ stress-relief potential and a health warning.

Also on the program are the New York premieres of Andrew List’s Dreams from the Aboriginal Dreamtime, a composition inspired by the creation legends of the Australian Aboriginals; Zodiac: Across the Universe, a series of one-minute miniatures by twelve different composers each describing a sign of the zodiac; and Guillaume Connesson’s Techno Parade, a whimsical whirlwind of a piece transcribed for the Zodiac Trio by the group’s violinist Vanessa Mollard.

The concert is on Saturday, March 26 at 7 pm at Spectrum, 121 Ludlow St, NY, NY. Tickets are $15 general admission, $10 students/seniors, and are available at the door. For more information, visit zodiactrio.com.

The Zodiac Trio is Kliment Krylovskiy, clarinet; Vanessa Mollard, violin and Riko Higuma, piano.

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Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra Concertmaster Margaret Batjer

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra Concertmaster Margaret Batjer

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (LACO) explores innate vs. learned creativity tied to masterworks by Mozart and Mendelssohn, whose extraordinary talent was evident in their earliest compositions, during the second program of Westside Connections, a chamber music series with a twist, on Thursday, April 7, 2016, 7:30 pm, at the Moss Theater in Santa Monica.  Curated and hosted by LACO Concertmaster Margaret Batjer, Westside Connections’ 2015-16 season features LACO musicians and cutting-edge neuroscientists exploring “Music and the Mind” through performance and conversation, followed by Q&A with audiences.  Among ideas probed during the three-concert series are how music moves us (and why), the possibility of pinpointing the location of creativity in the brain, and where the next wave in brain management research may to take us.

 

During the evening, special guest Dr. Susan Bookheimer, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCLA, discusses her study of remarkably gifted children, and she is joined by special guest Dr. Robert Bilder, Professor of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences and Professor of Psychology, UCLA, to reveal findings from the “Big C Project,” their fascinating joint research collaboration exploring exceptionally creative people in the arts and sciences.  The conversation is set against a performance of Mozart’s Quintet in E-flat major for Piano and Winds, which the composer himself called “the best thing I have so far written in my life,” featuring LACO Music Director Jeffrey Kahane, piano; LACO Principals Allan Vogel, oboe, Kenneth Munday, bassoon, Joshua Ranz, clarinet, and Andrew Shulman, cello; and LACO horn Kristy McArthur Morrell.  Guest violinist Cho-Liang Lin joins Kahane and Shulman for Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in D minor, considered his most beloved and popular chamber work.  After hearing it, Schumann declared Mendelssohn “the Mozart of the 19th century.”

 

Dr. Bilder holds the Michael Tennenbaum Family Chair in Creativity Research in the Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.  In addition to his NIH-sponsored research on brain and behavior, he directs the Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity, and is now studying the brains of “Big C” (exceptionally creative) artists and scientists, with support from the John Templeton Foundation.  Bilder also directs the UCLA Healthy Campus Initiative’s Mind Well program, which aims to help promote well-being and creative achievement throughout the UCLA campus community.

 

Dr. Bookheimer, holds the Joaquin Fuster Endowed Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience and is a Professor in the Deptartment of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the Department of Psychology.  She is a pioneer in brain mapping research using functional mag­netic resonance imaging (fMRI), which examines human brain activity in real time.  Her research focuses on language, memory and social cognition in health and in neurologic and psychiatric disorders from early development to aging.  Her clinical practice includes mapping brain function prior to surgery with fMRI, and mapping critical functions including language and music during awake neurosurgery using direct electrical stimulation of the brain.  Bookheimer’s recent work studies how the brain works dynami­cally to solve problems and integrate information in highly gifted and creative individuals.  This work aims to understand the unique­ness of each brain and the many different cognitive styles used by exceptional children and adults.

 

With a 30-year career spanning the globe, Lin has appeared as a soloist with an array of ensembles including the Detroit, Toronto and Dallas symphony orchestras; the Houston, Nashville and Singapore symphonies; the Bergen, Munich and Hong Kong philharmonics; and the Los Angeles and English cham­ber orchestras.  An avid chamber musician, he is music director of La Jolla Music Society’s SummerFest.  Lin has commissioned works from Tan Dun, John Harbison and Esa-Pekka Salonen.  In 2000, Musical America named him Instrumentalist of the Year.  Currently, Lin, who began his studies at five in Taiwan, is a professor of violin at Juilliard and Rice University.  He plays the 1715 ”Titian“ Stradivarius.

 

Each year, LACO’s trademark three-part Westside Connections, now in its eight season, steps outside the proverbial “music “box” to illustrate with fascinating intellectual discourse and superb artistry the myriad ways music is woven into society and our lives.  The 2015-16 Westside Connections series concludes May 5 when the evening centers on breathtaking songs by Schumann and Ravel, each of whom suffered severe mental collapse, with LACO musicians joined by special guest Dr. Linda Liau, Neurosurgeon, Professor and Director of the UCLA Brain Tumor Program, and guest artists Heidi Grant Murphy, soprano, and Robert Thies, piano.  In previous seasons, Westside Connections has explored connections between music and such disparate topics as architecture, the culinary arts, poetry, stories and the influences of Los Angeles on creativity.

 

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra is considered one of the world’s premier chamber orchestras as well as a pacesetter in presenting wide-ranging repertoire and adventurous commissions.  Its 2015-16 season, features a compelling mix of beloved masterpieces and genre-defying premieres from firmly established as well as notable up-and-coming composers programmed by Jeffrey Kahane, one of the world’s foremost conductors and pianists, who marks his 19th season as LACO’s music director.

 

Tickets (beginning at $65) are available online at laco.org, by calling LACO at 213 622 7001, or at the venue box office on the night of the concert, if tickets remain.  Student rush tickets ($12), based on availability, may be purchased at the box office one hour before the concert.  Also available for college students is the $30 “Campus to Concert Hall All Access Pass” – good for LACO’s three Westside Connections concerts at the Moss Theater, seven Orchestral Series concerts at either the Alex Theatre or UCLA’s Royce Hall and Discover Bach’s Cantata “Sleepers Awake” at Ambassador Auditorium.  Discounted tickets are also available by phone for groups of 12 or more.  The Moss Theater at New Roads School is located at 3131 Olympic Boulevard, Santa Monica, CA, 90404.

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