Posts Tagged “cd release”

Promo Video

For Immediate Release Composers Concordance Records presents the CD Release Concert for

Gene Pritsker’s chamber opera
William James’s Varieties of Religious Experience

Sunday, March 4th, 9:30pm 2012
Le Poisson Rouge
158 Bleecker Street, NY
event website http://lepoissonrouge.com/events/view/3026

For more information, contact:
Composers Concordance Records
646 522 9442
composersconcordancerecords@gmail.com

Composers Concordance Records celebrates its February 2012 release of Gene Pritsker’s chamber opera: 
’William James’s Varieties of Religious Experience’. The concert will feature arias from the opera performed by soprano Lynn Norris, jazz/gospel voice of Chanda Rule, baritone Charles Coleman, narrator Peter Christian Hall, with Gene Pritsker and Greg Baker; guitars,
Dan Barrett; cello and Larry Goldman; bass.

This event will also showcase music from upcoming Composers Concordance Records releases including:
Zentripetal String Duo with Lynn Bechtold – violin and Jen DeVore – cello.
Non Western Omelet by The International Street Cannibals.
Featuring  Dan Barrett – cello, Dan Cooper – bass, Max Pollak – tap and body percussion
Composers Concordance present ‘Song Cycles’. Featuring  Lynn Norris – soprano and Luis Andrei Cobo – piano
Subversion by guitarist Greg Baker.  Featuring Greg Baker and Gene Pritsker – guitars

You can sample music  from the album and learn more about it here:  http://www.wix.com/noizepunk/wj

here is a full aria from the opera Closer to me than my Own Breath Aria

The opera has received the following review:

“This new recording  is beautiful—musically and dramatically.” … “Delicate, taut, and incisive writing. Beautiful interplay between instruments and voices, between the rhythm/melodies/harmonies and the text. ‘Synaptic’ guitar picking; a really elegant solo improvisation on Track 5.”… “I ’m uplifted by this new Pritsker CD—impressed by the authenticity of music that “had to come out”, had to be composed, had to exist.” … “T his opera by Gene Pritsker honors that Jamesian notion. The opera—and this recording—are a welcome invitation to self-discovery, to mutual respect and tolerance for the spirituality (or lack thereof) of others, and to joyous, mindful living in community. Look for the CD when it’s released in February. Very worth your listening!”
- Doug McNair, Chamber Music Today, Jan. 2012
“This genuine chamber opera is a ground breaking contribution to the operatic genre for the early ’012s”…”The intellectual level of his (Pritsker’s) compositions marks a radical departure from most new “classical” music.”
- Peter Woolf, Musical Pointers, jan. 2012
“This chamber opera performance has beautiful vocals. I like it…You definitely have to check out this recording.”
- Peter Van Laarhoven, United-Mutations, Feb. 2012
“The stylistic range is broad and the synthesis effective”…”It is yet another convincing example of Gene Pritsker’s originality and distinctiveness as a composer. It should interest and delight those who seek the “new” in new music. This is indeed new!”
- Grego Applegate Edwards, Gapplegate Classical – Modern Music Blog, Feb. 20112
Composer Gene Pritsker has written over four hundred compositions, including chamber operas, orchestral and chamber works, electro-acoustic music and songs for hip-hop and rock ensembles. All of his compositions employ an eclectic spectrum of styles and are influenced by his studies of various musical cultures.

He is the founder and leader of Sound Liberation; an eclectic hip/hop-chamber-jazz-rock-etc. ensemble who have released cd’s on Col-legno and Innova Records. Gene’s music has been performed all over the world at various festivals and by many ensembles and performers, including the Adelaide Symphony, The Athens Camarata, Brooklyn and Berlin Philharmonic. He has worked closely with Joe Zawinul and has orchestrated major Hollywood movies.

The New York Times described him as “…audacious…multitalented.” Joseph Pehrson, writing in The Music Connoisseur, described Pritsker as “dissolv[ing] the artificial boundaries between high brow, low brow, classical, popular musics and elevates the idea that if it’s done well it is great music, regardless of the style or genre”. Raul d’Gama Rose writes in All About Jazz: “Barring the obvious exceptions, much of 21st century composition appears to be thinning in significance, but this might be about to change. Gene Pritsker is one of a very spare handful of composers effecting this change.

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Ayano Kataoka and Conor Nelson

Flute/percussionist duo Conor Nelson and Ayano Kataoka will close the inaugural season of Music at First on May 28, 2010, at 7:30 pm. This special concert is held in celebration of the release of the Duo’s CD “Breaking Training” (New Focus Recordings). Music at First is a new music series held at First Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn through May 2010. First Presbyterian Church is located in Brooklyn Heights at 124 Henry St. Directions are at www.fpcbrooklyn.org. There is a $10 suggested donation at the door with no advance reservations or ticket sales. Contact musicatfirst@gmail.com for more info.

This series, curated by Wil Smith (composer and organist at First Presbyterian), occurs monthly, featuring one performer or ensemble per evening. Smith describes Music at First as “a diverse mix of New York City’s best new music ensembles and performers, accessible to a wide audience of both community members and seasoned new music listeners.” Earlier performers in the series included Threefifty Duo, a “critic’s choice” (Time Out NY) performance by pianist Kathleen Supové, and cellist/vocalist/composer Jody Redhage and her band Fire in July.

Percussionist and marimbist Ayano Kataoka is known for her brilliant and dynamic technique, as well as the unique elegance and artistry she brings to her performances. A versatile performer, she regularly presents music of diverse genres and mediums. Last season, together with cellist Yo-Yo Ma at the American Museum of Natural History, Ms. Kataoka gave a world premiere of Bruce Adolphe’s Self Comes to Mind for cello and two percussionists, based on a text by neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, and featuring interactive video images of brain scans triggered by the live music performance. She also performed Leon Kirchner’s Flutings for Paula with Paula Robison in honor of Mr. Kirchner’s 90th birthday concert at New York’s Miller Theater and at the Gardner Museum in Boston. Kataoka was the first percussionist to be chosen for The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s Chamber Music Society Two, a three-season residency program for emerging artists offering high-profile performance opportunities.

Praised for his “long-breathed phrases and luscious tone” by the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Canadian flutist Conor Nelson is established as a leading flutist of his generation. Since his New York recital debut at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, he has appeared frequently as soloist and recitalist throughout the United States and abroad. Recent performances include engagements with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the National Repertory Orchestra, the Philharmonia of Yale, the Manhattan School of Music Philharmona, the Stony Brook Symphony, the Oshawa-Durham Symphony Orchestra, the Brevard Repertory Orchestra, the Festival Wind Orchestra, the Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Orchestra and at the Banff Centre. The only wind player to win the Grand Prize at the WAMSO Young Artist Competition, he recently won first prize at the William C. Byrd Young Artist Competition. In addition, he has received top prizes at the New York Flute Club Young Artist Competition and the Haynes International Flute Competition.

Involved in several exciting commissioning projects for their genre, the Conor and Ayano Duo has performed in Merkin Concert Hall, CAMI Hall, The Tokyo Opera City Hall, Tokyo Bunka Kaikan, Izumi Hall, and as guest artists for the Ottawa Flute Association in Canada. Their new CD, “Breaking Training”, features works by Dennis DeSantis, Roshanne Etezady, Gareth Farr, Naoko Hishinuma, Chan Ka Nin, and Teruyuki Noda.

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