Posts Tagged “classical”

miroloungecolor2013 copy Arts at The Park is pleased to announce the debut in its series of the   renowned Miró Quartet in a concert of masterpieces by Beethoven, Dutilleux and Schubert on Wednesday, March 26 at 8 PM at The Park Avenue Christian Church (known affectionately as “the Park”), 1010 Park Avenue at 85th Street in Manhattan. Tickets, available at Smarttix, are $40 Front Orchestra; $25, General Admission; and $20,Students/Seniors. The Quartet is thrilled at the opportunity to play in the acoustically rich neo-Gothic sanctuary of The Park.

Hailed by the New York Times as possessing “explosive vigor and technical finesse”, the dynamic Miró Quartet, one of America’s highestprofile chamber groups, enjoys its place at the top of the international chamber music scene. Now in its second decade, the quartet continues to captivate audiences and critics around the world with its startling intensity, fresh perspective, and mature approach. For their AATP debut performance, the Quartet will perform well-known works of Beethoven and Schubert alongside a 20th century masterwork of French composer Henri Dutilleux:

  • Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 18, No. 6, “La Malinconia” – Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • Ainsi la nuit – Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013)
  • Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D. 810, “Death and the Maiden” – Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

The Miró Quartet is comprised of:

About the Miró Quartet:

Founded in 1995 at the Oberlin Conservatory, the Miró Quartet met with immediate success winning first prizes at the Coleman, Fischoff, and Banff competitions as well as the prestigious Naumburg Chamber Music Award. The Miró Quartet was also a recipient of the Cleveland Quartet Award and was the first ensemble ever to be awarded the Avery Fisher Career Grant. Since then, the Miró Quartet has performed throughout the world in important venues such as Carnegie Hall, the Concertgebouw, the Berlin Philharmonic’s Kammermusikaal, and the Konzerthaus in Vienna.

The Miró Quartet has collaborated with such artists as Leif Ove Andsnes, Joshua Bell, Eliot Fisk, Lynn Harrell, Midori, Jon Kimura Parker and Pinchas Zukerman. A favorite of numerous summer festivals, the Quartet has appeared regularly at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, Chamber Music Northwest, La Jolla Summerfest, Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival, and the White Pine Festival.

Concert highlights of recent seasons include a highly anticipated and sold out return to Carnegie Hall to perform Beethoven’s complete Opus 59 Quartets (which they also recorded); collaborations with award-winning actor Stephen Dillane as part of Lincoln Center’s White Light Festival; and festival appearances at Chamber Music Northwest, Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival, Music@Menlo, and Ottawa ChamberFest.

The Miró Quartet has been heard on numerous national and international radio broadcasts, including National Public Radio’s Performance Today and Minnesota Public Radio’s Saint Paul Sunday. In addition, the Quartet has released numerous recordings, most recently the Op. 18 Quartets of Beethoven on the Vanguard Classics label. The Quartet’s recording of George Crumb’s Black Angels won the prestigious FrenchDiapason d’Or” prize.

Arts at The Park, a component of the Park Avenue Christian Church (known as “The Park”), brings together outstanding performers and ensembles from the greater New York City metropolitan area for programs that enrich and inspire and that touch our shared human story and experience. Arts at The Park include live music, theater, political and theological discourse, and family and holiday events. Artistic Director of Arts at The Park is Paul Vasile.

 

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On Sunday, March 16 at 2 pm, pianist Inna Faliks (www.innafaliks.com) will perform her eclectic program Dances and Passions at New York City’s Spectrum, 121 Ludlow (Floor 2, ring bell for 2), New York. In addition to Beethoven’s well-regarded Piano Sonata No. 23 (Appassionata), Faliks will also play the composer’s Polonaise, Op. 89 and Schumann’s Davidsbündler, Op. 6. Works by Shchedrin and New York City’s Ljova (Lev Zhurbin) complete the program. This will be Faliks’ first appearance at Spectrum.

Tickets are $15 general admission; $10 students and seniors. More information is available at http://spectrumnyc.com/blog/.

A resident of Los Angeles and past New Yorker, Faliks now serves as a tenured professor of piano at UCLA’s  Herb Albert School of Music. She is also the founder of New York’s Music/Words.

COMPLETE PROGRAM:

Beethoven, Polonaise, Op. 89/Sonata, Op. 57 (Appassionata)

(Intermission)

Shchedrin, Basso Ostinato
Ljova
, Sirota (with historical recording)
Schumann, Davidsbündler, Op. 6

Called “adventurous” and “passionate” by The New Yorker, Ukrainian-born Inna Faliks (www.innafaliks.com) has established herself as one of the most passionately committed, exciting and poetic artists of her generation. Since her acclaimed teenage debuts at the Gilmore Festival and with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, she has performed on many of the world’s great stages, with numerous orchestras, in solo appearances, and with conductors such as Leonard Slatkin and Keith Lockhart.

She recently appeared alongside British actress Lesley Nicol (“Mrs. Patmore” from Downton Abbey) in Nigel Hess’s production of Admission: One Shilling, a staged tribute to the legendary Dame Myra Hess. Her critically acclaimed CD on MSR Classics, Sound of Verse, was released in 2009, featuring music of Boris Pasternak, Rachmaninoff and Ravel. Her discography also includes a recital recording for the Yamaha Disklavier library, and her new Beethoven recording will be out this year. Faliks recently joined the illustrious faculty of UCLA,

 

 

 

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Matthew Halls, New Oregon Bach Festival Artistic Director

Matthew Halls, New Oregon Bach Festival Artistic Director


Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (LACO), continuing a long-established relationship with the Oregon Bach Festival, welcomes the Festival’s new Artistic Director Matthew Halls as guest conductor in his California debut, leading a program that spans the centuries and spotlights LACO Concertmaster Margaret Batjer, Principal Cello Andrew Shulman, Principal Oboe Allan Vogel and Principal Bassoon Kenneth Munday, on Saturday, January 25, 8 pm, at the Alex Theatre in Glendale, and Sunday, January 26, 2014, 7 pm, at UCLA’s Royce Hall. Halls, “a fresh and forceful talent” whose “music-making is strongly and clearly sculpted” (The Times, London), leads Mozart’s Ballet Music from Idomeneo, K. 367, Haydn’s Sinfonia concertante in B-flat major, and Beethoven’s playful Symphony No. 1 in C major, which was instantly hailed as a masterpiece. Providing a dramatic counterpoint to the program is Aaron Jay Kernis’ solemn Musica Celestis, a string-orchestra transcription of one of his string quartets that has been likened to Barber’s famous Adagio.

Halls, known for his dynamic work with both major symphony orchestras and opera companies and for his probing and vibrant interpretations of music of all periods, has been lauded by the Irish Times for his “discerning energy.” Based on the tremendous impact of his performances when he appeared for the first time at the Oregon Bach Festival in 2011, he was asked to succeed Helmuth Rilling as artistic director. He has since returned annually and assumed the post in July at the conclusion of the 2013 festival.
Concert Preludes, pre-concert talks held one hour before curtain and free for ticket holders, provide insights into the music and artists. LACO General Manager Andrea Laguni interviews Halls.

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra is considered one of the world’s premier chamber orchestras as well as a leader in presenting wide-ranging repertoire and adventurous commissions. Its 2013-14 season, the Orchestra’s 45th, features a compelling mix of beloved masterpieces and genre-defying premieres from firmly established as well as notable up-and-coming composers programmed by Jeffrey Kahane, one of the world’s foremost conductors and pianists, who marks his 17th season as LACO’s music director.

Tickets, starting at $25, are on sale now and may be purchased online at laco.org, by calling LACO at 213 622 7001. Discounted tickets are also available by phone for seniors 65 years of age and older and groups of 12 or more. College students may purchase student rush tickets ($10), based on availability, at the box office the day of the concert. Also available for college students is the $25 “Campus to Concert Hall All Access Pass” – good for all seven of LACO’s Orchestral series concerts, Discover Beethoven’s Eroica and three Westside Connections concerts.

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Mary Bauermeister

Mary Bauermeister


Karlheinz Stockhausen’s 70-minute masterpiece “Stimmung” (“Tuning/mood/atmosphere”), for six amplified voices, will be performed at the First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica on Sat., Jan. 25, 2014 by VOXNOVA Italia, which is making its international debut with this concert. Founded 22 years ago in France as VOXNOVA, the widely acclaimed European vocal ensemble will be reincarnated in 2014 with five Italian contemporary vocal music specialists under the direction of founder, bass baritone Nicholas Isherwood. The American-born singer, a protégé of the late composer, recently moved from Berlin to Rome. VOXNOVA Italia, he says, has “cracked the code” of Stockhausen’s score by producing the harmonic balances asked for by the composer. Described as a trance-like stream of consciousness, “Stimmung” was inspired by walking among the ancient pyramids of Mexico, as well as by the spirit of free love permeating the period. The work’s steamy erotic poetry, usually performed in German, will be heard in English.

Opening this concert, which recalls the “summer of love” and impossible dreams of the late 1960s, cellist Timothy Loo will provide a point of departure with “Nomos Alpha” (1966) by Iannis Xenakis. The highly complex 15-minute work is considered impossible to perform as written. Loo will employ innovative new technology to completely render the work.

Wed., Jan. 22, Villa Aurora, Pacific Palisades
Isherwood, who created the role of “Lucifer” in three of the operas making up Stockhausen’s massive cycle “Licht,” will perform “Capricorn” for singer and electronics, tailored to his voice by the composer. Isherwood will wear the original 1974 costume designed by Bauermeister. This performance will follow a rare performance of “Kontakte,” a seminal electronic work, in a new high-def digital restoration courtesy of Los Angeles-based composer Jennifer Logan and L.A.’s Occidental College. The 1960 premiere of the 30-minute work was also the occasion in which Stockhausen met visual artist and Fluxus catalyst Bauermeister, who will be present at this concert.

Sun., Jan. 26, 3 p.m., Goethe Institute, Los Angeles
The 80th birthday tribute to Bauermeister, the second of Stockhausen’s four wives, will conclude with an afternoon event devoted to her life and work. Reading in English from her new memoire, published in her native German, Bauermeister will discuss the ideas, both musical and visual, that were exchanged by the couple. Samples of elaborately embellished letters and musical diagrams, as well as her impromptu “altar” to Stockhausen will be on view. A nine-minute animated film, “Tribute to Mary Bauermeister,” in which she appears with such cultural icons as John Cage, Yoko Ono and Nam June Paik, will be screened.

January 22, 8pm MARY MEETS KARLHEINZ Villa Aurora
Karlheinz Stockhausen Kontakte (4-channels, 1960)
Stockhausen Capricorn (singer & 4-channels, 1974) from Tierkreis (Zodiac)
520 Paseo Miramar, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272; Shuttle starts at 7pm; Tickets: $25/$15 students

January 25, 8pm HALLUCINATION First Presbyterian/SM
Iannis Xenakis Nomos Alpha (solo cello, 1966)
Karlheinz Stockhausen Stimmung (1968)
1220 2nd St., Santa Monica, CA 90402; pre-concert talk at 7pm; Tickets: $45 general/$20 students

January 26, 3pm MARY ELECTRIFIES Goethe Institute
Mary Bauermeister Reading, screening and improvisation with Nicholas Isherwood 5750 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90036; Free admission; Online RSVP requested

Tickets: jacarandamusic.org; Information: (213) 483-0216.

About Jacaranda: Jacaranda, with a motto of “music at the edge,” is a series of intimate concert adventures into the realm of new and rarely heard classical music designed to awaken curiosity, passion and discovery in diverse audiences. Founded in 2003 by arts impresario Patrick Scott and conductor/organist Mark Alan Hilt, Jacaranda produces a series (eight concerts this season) that features current and rising stars in the world of classical music performance. Celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2013-14, Jacaranda’s full 2013-14 season information is available at jacarandamusic.org. Most concerts are held at First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica, 1220 Second Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401. For information or to purchase tickets go to jacarandamusic.org, or call (213) 483-0216.

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On Friday, December 13, 2013 at 8 pm, the New York City Master Chorale, under the direction of Artistic Director Thea Kano, opens its eighth season with a “Holiday Concert,” featuring Camille Saint-Saëns’ Christmas Oratorio and the New York City premiere of Paul Leavitt’s Magnificat. The concert, to be held at the Church of Saint Ignatius of Antioch (552 West End Avenue at 87th Street), features organist James Kennerley and phenomenal soloists from the Chorale. Tickets are $35 (general admission) or $25 (student/senior) and can be purchased atwww.nycmasterchorale.org or at the door, space permitting.

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Digital Download & 7” Vinyl Release Date: October 15, 2013
Vinyl Available Exclusively at: www.christopherbono.com

VIDEO: The Inspiration Behind Unity & The Unexcelled Mantra
http://bit.ly/UnityMantraVideo

On October 15, 2013, composer Christopher Bono releases two new singles, Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra, performed by The New York Virtuoso Singers led by music director Harold Rosenbaum. These choral works will be available on Bono’s label Our Silent Canvas, distributed digitally by Naxos and released on limited edition 7” vinyl. The recordings were made at the American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York by Grammy-winning producer Silas Brown.

Visual artist DZO Olivier has created original illustrations for the cover art for Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra recordings, intimately influenced by Bono’s music and the concepts it explores. Videos inspired by these works created by film artists Tobias Stretch (Radiohead, Deftones) and Ingibjörg Birgisdóttir (Sigur Rós) will be released on November 5, 2013.

Bono describes Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra as contemplating the search for a modern form of spirituality. He says, “Both works explore a path to transcendence or ‘true being’ through union with the cosmos – The Unexcelled Mantra from a Mahayana Buddhist point of view and Unity from the Western philosophical tradition of Plato.”

Unity is a choral piece based on some of the musical and philosophical concepts of Plato’s Republic. The chosen text was taken from a section of the Republic in which Plato discusses the power of mathematics, but Bono immediately saw it could also be viewed as a metaphor for the phenomenon of meditation. He says, “This multi-dimensional observation was a key inspiration for me when writing the work, both considering the mathematical qualities of music and the esoteric concepts of achieving union with the All.” In addition, Bono experimented with the power Plato claimed existed in the Dorian and Phrygian modes. According to Plato, the Dorian would “fittingly imitate the utterances and accents of a brave man who is engaged in warfare,” while the Phrygian was suitable “for a man engaged in works of peace.”

The Unexcelled Mantra is a setting of text from the Heart Sutra, a sacred text in Mahayana Buddhism on understanding Shunyata, or Emptiness, in order to realize Nirvana. The mantra reads “gaté gaté paragaté parasamgaté bodhi svaha,” which can be translated as “Go, go, go beyond, go totally beyond, be rooted in the ground of enlightenment.”

The release of Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra follows Bono’s first classical album, Invocations, a chamber music collection released in fall 2012 and on vinyl in August 2013. The originality and inventiveness of Invocations was noted by composer and writer Frank Oteri in NewMusicBox, who wrote, “While much of 21st-century contemporary composition is not beholden to any rules, to the extent that I could probably claim everyone to be an ‘outsider’ in some ways, Bono’s music sounds as though everything he writes is something he is discovering for the very first time, even if there are clear reference points throughout to the sound worlds of other composers from both our own time and other eras.”

Christopher Bono entered the world of classical music much later than most of his contemporaries. He spent his childhood and teenage years devoted to baseball; in 1999 he was drafted by the Seattle Mariners but an injury kept him from playing. Filling the void left by the end of his athletic endeavors, Bono began playing the guitar when he was 21, and for several years he toured, recorded, and performed in an alternative roots-rock style. In his mid-20s, he made the choice to learn classical composition techniques in order to more fully realize his music. For seven years, in nearly hermetic isolation, he taught himself to read music, and studied composition independently with Juilliard professor Kendall Briggs and at La Scola Cantorum in Paris.

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The acclaimed American Youth Symphony (AYS), one of the nation’s leading professional training orchestras for musicians ages 15 to 27, launches its 49th season with a free concert featuring the highly anticipated West Coast premiere of Timothy Andres’ Bathtub Shrine, Tchaikovsky’s elegant Variations on a Rococo Theme, showcasing rising star Allan Steele, AYS’s Principal Cello, and Berlioz’ epic Symphony fantastique on Sunday, October 6, 2013, 7 pm, at UCLA’s Royce Hall. Music Director Alexander Treger, currently in his 16th season leading AYS, conducts the 106-member orchestra, noted for its innovative programming and inspiring performances.

Also featured is a free pre-concert screening at 5:30 pm of the film Keeping Score: Symphony fantastique, part of the San Francisco Symphony’s critically applauded Keeping Score film series, which, narrated by Michael Tilson Thomas, tells the story of Berlioz’ purportedly opium-fueled obsession with Irish actress Harriet Smithson for whom his love, passion and jealousy drove the groundbreaking symphony’s creation. Berlioz’ work was debuted at the Paris Conservatoire in 1830, quickly becoming an audience and orchestra favorite.

“The program is designed to highlight the exceptional talents of the orchestra as well as to provide our musicians with critical training in some of the major orchestral repertoire and contemporary works,” says Treger, who during the 2013-14 season leads a total of five free concerts as well AYS’s annual gala concert.

Andres – hailed by the Los Angeles Times for music that demonstrates “a strong sense of building on classical music tradition, while also moving that tradition into a new and hip place” – composed Bathtub Shrine on a commission by the Yale Symphony Orchestra as a playful response to the widely reverberating acoustics of Yales’ Woosley Hall, which Andre’s describes as having “a staggering 13-second reverberation…the effect of a giant bathroom.” He also wrote the eight-minute piece in homage to the orchestra’s “fierce music-making” and warm “camaraderie”.

AYS has trained more than 2,300 musicians since it was founded, and many of its alumni hold principal positions with the world’s top orchestras, the Chicago Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, New York Philharmonic and San Francisco Symphony, among them. Additionally, AYS’s free concert series, which has drawn more than a quarter of a million people to the Royce Hall since its inception, provides vital music outreach to the community.

This season AYS also appears on the “Sundays Live at LACMA” concert series on October 20, 2013; presents “The Elfman Project II,” the continuation of a three-year exploration of the composer’s brilliant music, on November 24, 2013; showcases the irrepressible music of composer Jefferson Friedman on February 9, 2014; hosts the “Springtime in Paris” gala on March 9, 2013; and wraps the season with “The Alumni Project,” where fellows will share a stand with celebrated alumni in Strauss’ An Alpine Symphony. This season finale concert will also feature gifted young violinist Nigel Armstrong, a finalist in the 2011 Tchaikovsky International Competition and former AYS Concertmaster.

Reservations are recommended but not required for the American Youth Symphony’s free concert at Royce Hall. Royce Hall is located on the campus of UCLA at 10745 Dickson Plaza in Westwood, CA, 90095. For more information, please call (310) 470-2332 or log on to www.AYSymphony.org.

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Free Seminar:  November 4, 2013, 3-5pm Eastern

Time Management for Creative People

With Aaron Landsman, Tribeca Leadership Affiliate Consultant

RSVP

Attend: in person at Saint Peter’s Church in midtown Manhattan or via live-stream

A focus session for musicians and other music professionals on managing your time for creative projects, administrative tasks, emails and social media, self and family needs and wants, and—if necessary—worry. Learn the 20-minute rule, the difference between urgent and important, and prioritizing your own projects over offers to participate in others’ gigs. Landsman coaches artists and executives in the creative community through Tribeca Leadership, LLC, among other groups. He is also a stage and commercial actor, playwright and monologist.

First Tuesdays is a free professional development seminar series presented by Chamber Music America in partnership with Saint Peter’s Church and Midtown Arts Commons. Workshops are live-streamed and archived on the CMA website.

 

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Free Seminar: 42 Revenue Streams for Musicians

With Jean Cook, Director of Progams, Future of Music Coalition

Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 3-5 pm Eastern

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Attend in person or online:

How do you earn your money from music? Learn ways to expand your revenue-generating capacity and formulate the best mix of music income for you. Join Jean Cook, Director of Programs from the Future of Music Coalition, in a discussion of the 42 revenue streams available to composers and performers based on changes in copyright law and FMC’s findings from its Artist Revenue Streams, a project that collects and studies data from U.S. musicians on how they make a living.

For the last two years Jean Cook  co-directed FMC’s Artist Revenue Streams project. She is a member of New Music USA’s New Media Council and also currently serves as Chair of APAP’s Classical Connections Committee. Cook is a also a musician and producer.

Future of Music Coalition is a national nonprofit organization that works to ensure a diverse musical culture where artists flourish, are compensated fairly for their work, and where fans can find the music they want.  fairly for their work, and where fans can find the music they want.

First Tuesdays is a free professional development seminar series presented by Chamber Music America in partnership with Saint Peter’s Church and Midtown Arts Commons.

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Free Seminar: The Affordable Care Act Primer

With Renata Maninaro, Eastern Region Director of Health Services for the Actors Fund

Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 3:00-5:00 p.m.  Eastern

RSVP

Attend:

Learn how the Affordable Care Act will affect musicians and small music companies. Health insurance options for people working in the performing arts should increase greatly in the coming year, as competitive insurance exchanges are implemented, along with subsidies for low- to middle-income subscribers, and small business tax credits.

Renata Marinaro, Eastern Region Director of Health Services for the Actors Fund,  will be your guide to the new health-insurance opportunities, which become effective as of   January 1, 2014.

First Tuesdays is a professional development workshop series that offers free monthly seminars for the small ensemble field from October through June. The program is presented by Chamber Music America in partnership with Saint Peter’s Church and Midtown Arts Common.

Funding is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York State Council on the Arts and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Additional support for this seminar is provided by New York Community Trust, the Community Service Society and the Actors Fund.

 

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