Posts Tagged “contemporary classical”

Promo graphic for Symphony Number One

Symphony Number One: Façade

BALTIMORE, MD  —  Symphony Number One will make their concert debut at Carriage House Baltimore on March 7 & 8, 2015 with the world premiere of Trope by James Chu. Led by conductor Jordan Randall Smith, the program will also feature William Walton’s Façade for chamber orchestra and reciter. Symphony Number One is a unique addition to Baltimore’s contemporary music scene. The group will oversee the commission, performance, and promotion of substantial works by emerging composers and program them alongside carefully selected works of the classical canon.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

Façade is a set of “Entertainments” or short musical numbers written between 1926 and 1938 by English composer Sir William Walton (1902-1983). Walton sets nonsense poetry by Dame Edith Sitwell (1887-1964). Soprano Laura Whittenberger, will recite Edith Sitwell’s whimsical verses and Catarina Farreira will perform Walton’s dauntingly virtuosic solo cello part. Façade is scored for flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, percussion, cello, and reciter.

In the program’s featured World Premiere, tentatively titled Trope, James Chu augments the Walton chamber ensemble with a violin to round out the instrumental/vocal octet. This new work is Chu’s artistic response to Façade and builds on his previous theatrical work at Princeton University and at the Peabody Conservatory. This marks the second collaboration between Chu and Whittenberger; Smith previously conducted Whittenberger in the Peabody Opera Theater‘s 2013 production of Poulenc’s Dialogues des Carmélites.

Production Details:

Saturday, March 7 at 8pm   Facebook | Google

Sunday, March 8 at 3pm     Facebook | Google

Carriage House Baltimore

2225 Hargrove Street (alley between N. Calvert and St. Paul) Baltimore, MD 21218

Admission is $0-15 (pay what you want) at symphno1.com

VIP admission by contributing to the orchestra’s crowdfunding campaign at Kickstarter.

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LATER THIS SPRING       

May 8 & 9, 2015: Symphony Number One presents MOZART IN THE [urban] JUNGLE, featuring harpist Jordan Thomas and flutist Raoul Cho. The duo will be joining the orchestra for Mozart’s Concerto for Flute and Harp. The program will open with Anton Webern’s one and only Read the rest of this entry »

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June 10th, at 7:30 PM

Musical Amoeba presents Washington Square Winds

Musical Amoeba’s final concert of the season, with the Washington Square Winds, will be presented June 10th, at 7:30 pm, at the Church Street School of Music in lower Manhattan.

Music of CUNY Grad composer Austin Shadduck, recent Queens College graduates Gregory J Menillo and William Wheeler, and founder of the blog/magazine “I Care if You Listen” Thomas Deneuville will be presented along side a performance of Leos Janacek’s sextet ‘Mládi’.

Musical Amoeba is a new concert series, now on it’s third official concert, whose focus is to bring new compositions to the world, while also juxtaposing them against the historical canon. In order to bring a diversity of sounds, Musical Amoeba seeks to work with established groups, allowing them to curate part of the program, leading to a wide variety of music. Musical Amoeba has worked with the Samadi-Keene duo, Washington Square Winds, along with premiering its own ensemble in May, STRIA.

The Washington Square Winds, founded in 2009, is a wind quintet which seeks to bring new repertoire to life by collaborating with emerging composers. Their annual series “They’re Alive” has become a hotbed of premiers, with several works specifically written or arranged for it. They have also recently presented “The Fisherman and other stories”, with Oracle Hysterical, blending Brothers Grimm tales with contemporary music.

For more information:

 

www.musicalamoeba.com

www.washingtonsquarewinds.org

facebook.com/musicalamoeba

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ensemble Pamplemousse

Ensemble Pamplemousse

Ensemble Pamplemousse:
Through the Magnifying Glass
a surreal exploration of miniature and limitless aural possibilities

February 26, 2013 : 8:00 pm
$15/$10
Roulette
509 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, NY
TICKETS: roulette.org/events/ensemble-pamplemousse

 

 

Seven works bring into focus the seemingly limitless aural possibilities of wood, plastic,
and metal combining in the percieved symbiosis of ‘instruments’. Not just an indexing
of microscopic sound, these aural materials are presented as concise musical objects,
critically demystifying what is often accepted as ‘other’ sounds. By combining the
stability of formal strategy with minutely instable sound material, the music is elevated
beyond the rhetoric of mere instrumental syntax, realizing a wider, more substantial
dialogue.

New and recent works by Alex Sigman, George Lewis, Andrew Greenwald, Natacha Diels, Ivan Naranjo, and Rama Gottfried.

Performed by:
Natacha Diels, flute; Kiku Enomoto, violin; Jessie Marino, cello; David Broome, keys, Maria Stankova, voice; Andrew Greenwald, percussion

ABOUT ENSEMBLE PAMPLEMOUSSE:

“[Theirs is] a style and concept that bridges the gap between the earliest conscious sounds humans made together and the most up to the moment exploration of musical possibilities…the event horizon of each sound describ[es] a moment with infinite possibilities, including infinite duration.” (George Grella, THE BIG CITY)
Founded in 2002 by Natacha Diels and Rama Gottfried as a vehicle for musical exploration, Pamplemousse presents concerts of extraordinary focus and clarity. Comprised of virtuosic musicians trained in the classical, improvisational, and electronic realms, the group consistently delivers fresh, exhilarating new concepts in sound. The members’ eagerness for aural discovery has allowed for ample experimentation processes, where boundaries are non-existent, and from which a strong dialogue has emerged. Among the group’s vernacular resides formerly unfathomable sound landscapes formed by the acute relationships the performers have forged with each other, and as they alternate roles with the composers who are an intrinsic part of the ensemble.
The product, ceaselessly uncompromising and resolutely beautiful, is created by incredibly innovative, yet-to-be-named approaches to performance and composition.

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