Posts Tagged “Free”

Wednesday, August 3, 2016 at 6:30pm

Hearst Plaza at Lincoln Center
10 Lincoln Center Plaza
New York, NY 10023

Free concert
More info

Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 4.46.07 PM

International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) members tenor Peter Tantsits and harpist Megan Conley perform the world premiere of Anna Thorvaldsdottir’s “For it will never return” in a free micro-concert at Hearst Plaza, part of Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival. “For it will never return” was commissioned by ICE through their First Page Commissioning project and is part of Mostly Mozart Festival’s effort to showcase contemporary music; the new work is one of 50 to be premiered by ICE during the 2016 festival.

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Sunday, July 10, 2016 at 3-4pm
The Noguchi Museum
9-01 33rd Road (at Vernon Boulevard)
Long Island City, NY 11106


Bang on a Can and The Noguchi Museum continue their monthly summer concert series with renowned Czech violinist/singer/composer Iva Bittova and her son, pianist Antonin Fajt, performing in the Noguchi Museum’s outdoor sculpture garden.

Bittova is recognized worldwide for her unique solo style, displaying a musical worldview and visionary creativity unlike any other. New York Magazine describes, “Her sound is invigorating, urgent, and also soothing; it is a fusion of Old World and new-music sensibilities.” The duo will perform their own compositions, improvisations, plus Moravian and Slovakian songs by Leos Janacek and Bela Bartok, arranged by Bittova and Fajt. All concerts are free with Museum admission.

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Free and open to the public
Thursday, June 16, 2016 at 7:30pm

Miller Theatre at Columbia University
2960 Broadway (at 116th Street)
New York, NY 10027


Music Director George Manahan leads the American Composers Orchestra in new works by seven composers from the Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute: Jonathan Finlayson (b. 1982), Brian Friedland (b. 1982), Ethan Helm (b. 1990), Guy Mintus (b. 1991), Ben Morris (b. 1993), John La Barbera (b. 1945), and Dawn Norfleet.

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute (JCOI) is a new development in the jazz field, and a natural outgrowth of the orchestra’s long-running interest in creative and improvised music. JCOI is led by ACO in partnership with the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music in Los Angeles and the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University in New York.

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Sarah Cahill, pianist: Photo by Marianne La Rochelle

Pianist Sarah Cahill. Photo by Marianne La Rochelle



February 24–28, 2016

Noguchi Museum | 9-01 33rd Road (at Vernon Boulevard)
Long Island City, NY

For one week in February, the chill and grey skies of winter will dissipate for visitors to the Noguchi Museum’s ground-floor galleries, where internationally celebrated pianist Sarah Cahill will take up residence, performing Mamoru Fujieda’s stunning cycle of short pieces titled Patterns of Plants throughout the Museum’s opening hours.

Patterns of Plants represents an extraordinary fusion of nature and technology. To create the piece, Fujieda measured the electrical impulses on the leaves of plants, and converted the data he obtained into sound. He then identified musical patterns within the sound, and used them as the basis for these miniatures.

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New Years Celebration

chamber orchestra works by composers from Italy and the USJan 10_2

Ken Perlman, banjo
Max Lifchitz, conductor
The North/South Chamber Orchestra

music by

Elizabeth Bell, Paolo Boggio, Max Lifchitz & Harold Schiffman


Sunday, January 10 at 3 PM


Christ & St Stephen’s Church
120 West 69th St (bet Bway & Columbus)
New York City

Free Admission (no tickets necessary)

North/South Consonance, Inc. will open its 36th Winter/Spring season of free-admission concerts on Sunday afternoon January 10, 2016 when banjo virtuoso Ken Perlman will join conductor Max Lifchitz and the Grammy nominated North/South Chamber Orchestra for a performance of Harold Schiffman’s delightful Banjo Concerto. The multigenerational program will also feature works by Elizabeth Bell and Max Lifchitz as well as the first US performance of a recent work by the young Italian composer Paolo Boggio.

The concert will take place at the acoustically superior but intimate auditorium of Christ & St Stephen’s Church (120 West 69th St – bet Bway & Columbus) on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. It will start at 3 PM and end at 4:45 PM. No tickets necessary.

Hailed as “the Heifetz of the Banjo” Ken Perlman is an acknowledged master of the 5-string banjo. The Glasgow (UK) Herald noted: “Perlman can make his instrument do more or less anything he wants it to” as his pioneering claw-hammer style picking helps spotlight the power and expressiveness of the wide range of music he performs. Perlman has toured across North America, Great Britain, Ireland, Western Europe and Australia. An acclaimed teacher of folk-music instrumental skills, Perlman has authored widely respected banjo and guitar instruction books and has been on staff at prestigious teaching festivals around the world.

Since its inception in 1980, the North/South Chamber Orchestra has brought to the attention of the New York City public over 1,000 works by composers hailing from the Americas and elsewhere representing a wide spectrum of aesthetic views. Its activities are made possible in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs as well as grants from the Women’s Philharmonic Advocacy and the Music Performance Trust Funds. Contributions by numerous individual donors are also gratefully acknowledged.


Elizabeth Bell (b. 1928; Cincinnati, OH) attended Wellesley College and The Juilliard School where her mentors included Vittorio Giannini and Peter Mennin. Described by the American Record Guide as “one of our country’s leading composers” and by Fanfare Magazine as “a fine composer whose instrumental music is particularly striking,” her works for voice, solo instruments, chamber ensembles, and orchestra, have been performed throughout the US and abroad. Her Concertino for Chamber Orchestra is a three movement work employing an ensemble consisting of winds, piano and strings.

The compositions of Paolo Boggio (b. 1964; Verecelli, Italy) have garnered awards and prizes in several international competitions and are published by RAI Trade and Berben Editions. Educated at the St Cecilia Academy in Rome and the Birmingham Conservatory in England, Boggio now teaches at the Torino Conservatory. The press has described his style as “eclectic, combining deliberately outdated gestures with a sense of parody.” Written in 2013, his multi-movement work Shi-Kiai for winds and strings was inspired by Chinese Taoist philosophy — a holistic conception of nature.

Active as composer, pianist and conductor, Max Lifchitz (b. 1948; Mexico City) was awarded first prize in the 1976 International Gaudeamus Competition for Performers of Twentieth Century Music held in Holland. Robert Commanday, writing for The San Francisco Chronicle described him as “a composer of brilliant imagination and a stunning, ultra-sensitive pianist.” The New York Times music critic Allan Kozinn praised Mr. Lifchitz for his “clean, measured and sensitive performances” while Anthony Tommasini remarked that he “conducted a strong performance.” Payton MacDonald writing for the American Record Guide remarked: ”Mr. Lifchitz is as good on the podium as he is behind the piano.” His Yellow Ribbons No. 40 belongs to an ongoing series of compositions written as homage to the former American hostages in Iran. These compositions represent a personal way of celebrating the artistic and political freedom so often taken for granted in the West. The performance of the work will honor the tragic victims of the recent attacks in Paris, France and San Bernandino, California.

Harold Schiffman (b. 1928 in North Carolina) has been described by the international press as “a most distinguished composer whose well-crafted and communicative music repays repeated hearings.” He taught composition at Florida State University from 1959 until 1983 and also directed that institution’s New Music Festival. Especially written for Ken Perlman, Schiffman’s three-movement Banjo Concerto is cast in a traditional fast-slow-fast pattern. Inspired by Appalachian’s melodies, the work’s musical language recalls Baroque-era lute music while offering the soloist ample opportunity for technical display.


For the complete Winter/Spring concert series schedule please visit

To stream, download and/or purchase the more than 60 compact discs released under the North/South Recordings label please go to

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The Passion of Anne Frank, a haunting, major, new oratorio based on the Diary of Anne Frank, with music and lyrics composed by 125 high school students from downtown Los Angeles’ Ramón C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts, is being premiered by the students in conjunction with the Los Angeles Master Chorale Chamber Singers, professional instrumentalists, and student soloists in free matinee and evening performances on Thursday, January 22, at noon, and Friday, January 23, at 7 pm, at the high school’s main auditorium. (Ample free on-site parking is available.) The unforgettable hour-long work with compelling arias and emotional choruses tells the poignant story of Anne Frank, a young Jewish girl whose now famous diary was written during the two years she spent in hiding with her family in German-occupied Holland during World War II. The performances are the culmination of the Los Angeles Master Chorale’s award-winning “Voices Within” artists-in-residence program, designed to foster collaboration among students as they create and perform their own original choral works. The piece also aligns with the Chorale’s “passion music” theme this season, which features passions by Bach, Tan Dun and Richard Einhorn.

Anne Frank chronicled in a diary she received for her 13th birthday her secret thoughts as she became a young woman during the difficult days of Nazi occupation. Two months after her 15th birthday, the diary abruptly ends. The Secret Annex, where Anne had lived, had been raided by German officials and the Frank family – her father, Otto, her mother, and her sister, Margot, along with four other people hiding with them – were separated and sent to concentration camps. Otto was the family’s sole survivor after the war. His secretary, Miep, who had helped the family while they were in hiding, found Anne’s diary on the floor of the empty annex and kept it for him. Once published, Anne’s diary quickly became known around the world, serving as a touchstone for the six million Jews lost during the Holocaust. Permission for the story adaptation has been kindly granted by the Anne Frank Fonds Basel.

The 9th through 12th grade students worked closely over a 20-week period with the guidance and mentorship of singer Alice Kirwan Murray, lyricist Doug Cooney and composer Jonathan Beard, as well as their own choir teachers, Desiree Fowler and Stormy Sacks. They learned how to adapt a classic work of literature, write a libretto based on the adaptation and create the melodies for each movement of the oratorio. They also learned techniques for capturing the “voice” of the characters and how to propel the momentum of the plot and paint the mood of a scene. After the work was completed, students auditioned for feature roles and received vocal coaching to prepare for the culmination performance. This is the fifth year LAMC has offered its “Voices Within” program at the school.

An oratorio is an extended musical composition with a text dramatic in character for solo voices, chorus and orchestra, performed with minimal action, costume and scenery. Complex and sophisticated musical works, they challenge even seasoned composers, making the student’s accomplishments particularly noteworthy. Passion music, a type of oratorio, is a musical setting traditionally based on Gospel texts reflecting the persecution and suffering of Christ, but often times by extension used as an allegory for other historical figures who may have suffered much in the same way.

This massive undertaking is part of the Los Angeles Master Chorale’s award-winning music education program, “Voices Within,” which was originally designed to teach fifth graders collaborative and compositional skills by composing and performing their own original songs and has engaged over 25,000 children and created over 350 original songs since its launch in 2001.

Encouraged by previous successful collaborations involving elementary and middle school students, and with the support of the California Arts Council’s Artists-in-School Program, the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts, the Los Angeles Master Chorale adapted the “Voices Within” curriculum to address the advanced maturity of high school students, specifically choral students at the new visual and performing arts high school in downtown LA.

The concert is free, and seating is first come, first served. Reservations required. Visit LAMC.ORG for details. Cortines High School of Visual and Performing Arts is located at 450 N. Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012. Campus parking is free (enter on Cesar Chavez Avenue).

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Windsbacher Knabenchor

Windsbacher Knabenchor

Los Angeles Children’s Chorus (LACC), building upon its long history of presenting other children’s choirs from the U.S. and abroad, hosts the highly anticipated Southern California debut of the illustrious German boys and mens choir Windsbacher Knabenchor on Sunday, October 26, 2014, at Pasadena Presbyterian Church. The exchange is part of Windsbacher’s 13-day U.S. tour, its first in 23 years, to commemorate the 25th anniversary of fall of the Berlin Wall and Germany’s subsequent reunification. Noted for its distinctive soaring sound and invigorating performances, the choir, which hails from the town of Windsbacher, Germany, is under the direction of Martin Lehman. The concert also features LACC’s acclaimed Concert Choir and Young Men’s Ensemble. The three choirs perform separately, then combine forces for the finale to sing James Erb’s moving arrangement of Shenandoah. Last summer, LACC’s Concert Choir participated in a workshop and performance with Windsbacher Knabenchor while touring Germany.

Windsbacher Knabenchor’s broad repertoire spans the Baroque era to contemporary music, but for the performance, the choir performs mostly German a cappella sacred and secular music, selecting from such works as Pachelbel’s Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied, Bach’s Ich Lasse Dich Nicht, and Bruckner’s Os justi, as well as German “hiking songs,” love songs and madrigals, among others.

LACC’s Concert Choir, conducted by Artistic Director Anne Tomlinson, highlights the season’s theme Celebrating American Song with performances of Copland’s Ching-a-ring chaw; a haunting setting of the prayer Ave Maria sung in Spanish composed by Bay Area artist, Henry Mollicone; and Guide Me as I Walk Along, a work sung by the Cherokee Nation during their displacement on the Trail of Tears, which the chorus will sing in Cherokee.

LACC’s Young Men’s Ensemble, directed by Dr. Steven Kronauer, adds a Germanic touch performing such works as Bach’s Der Herr segne Euch, and Brahms’ Lass Dich nur nichts nicht dauren, as well as Jonah by renowned American composer Henry Leck.

“We are pleased to host this international choral exchange and welcome the esteemed Windsbacher Knabenchor to Southern California for the first time,” says LACC Artistic Director Anne Tomlinson. “These amazingly talented boys have captivated audiences around the globe.”

Founded in 1946 by Hans Thamm, Windsbacher Knabenchor, a “cultural ambassador“ of Nürnberg’s Metropolitan Region and a “trademark” of Franconia, acheived national and international renown under his successor, Karl-Friedrich Beringer. In 2012, Martin Lehmann was named conductor of the choir. Hailed for its musicality, precision and purity of sound, it regularly performs with such leading orchestras as the Deutsche Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, the Bamberger Symphoniker and the Akademie füralte Musik Berlin, and has appeared at such music festivals as the Rheingau Musikfestiva and the Bachwoche Ansbach. It has also toured Europe, Japan, North and South America, Israel, Australia, Taiwan, Singapore and the Peoples Republic of China. Its numerous CDs, radio broadcasts and television appearances have garnered raves from music critics and audiences alike.

In addition to its Southern California appearance, Windsbacher’s tour this fall includes performances in San Francisco and Berkeley, CA; Groton and Boston, MA; New Haven, CT; Philadelphia and Gettysburg, PA; and Washington, D.C. Windsbacher’s tour is supported by the Bavarian Ministry of Culture (“Ministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Kultur”). The choir previously made its U.S. debut at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., in 1986, returning there in 1991 for the Center’s German Festival.

The concert is free (suggested donation $10) and reservations are not required. Pasadena Presbyterian Church is located at 585 East Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91101. For more information about the concert and LACC, please call (626) 793-4321 or visit

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Los Angeles Children's Chorus Young Men's Ensemble

Los Angeles Children’s Chorus Young Men’s Ensemble

Los Angeles Children’s Chorus (LACC) is holding auditions for middle school- and high school-aged boys with changing or changed voices for its Young Men’s Ensemble on Thursday, August 21, 2014, at Pasadena Presbyterian Church, with appointments beginning at 4:30 pm. Candidates must prepare one solo art or folk song and will also be gauged on their ability to sing as part of an ensemble. Those interested in auditioning should be proficient in the fundamentals of music theory and musicianship. The vocal audition also includes a written music theory test and a sight-singing evaluation.

LACC’s Young Men’s Ensemble is one of only a few choirs in the country to serve young male vocalists with changing voices. Led by Dr. Steven Kronauer, it offers quality vocal and choral training, providing boys with essential tools to help them sing through their vocal transition and a forum where they can learn more about the healthy development of their maturing voices at their own pace in a fun, understanding and encouraging environment.

Kronauer notes that one of the fundamental considerations for working with the choir is adjusting to the needs of each individual voice to ensure that each boy sings in a range that is healthy for him.

Established in 2009, Young Men’s Ensemble holds rehearsals weekly on Sunday evenings (5:30 – 7:15 pm) and features a specially tailored musicianship course and individualized vocal coaching sessions that adhere to LACC’s exceptionally high standards.

Among numerous highlights, YME has toured Germany, Austria, Italy and Alaska; performed with Cuba’s celebrated Sine Nomine and the esteemed University of Michigan Men’s Glee Club and Harvard Glee Club; attended a retreat at USC Thornton School of Music; and participated in a special seminar with acclaimed counter-tenor David Daniels and world famous tenor Ben Hepner.

Auditions will be held at Pasadena Presbyterian Church, located at 585 East Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, California 91101. For more information or to make an audition appointment, please call (626) 793-4231 or visit

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Cinco de Mayo Celebration

100 Years of Piano Music by Mexican Composers


Max Lifchitz


Max Lifchitz, piano

works by

Carlos Chavez, Manuel Enriquez, Max Lifchitz,
Manuel M. Ponce, Maria Teresa Prieto,
Silvestre Revueltas
& Brian Banks

Monday, May 5 at 8 PM
Christ and St Stephen’s Church
120 West 69th St (bet Bway & Columbus)
New York, NY 10023

Free Admission


Max Lifchitz celebrates the Cinco de Mayo Holiday

performing works by three generations of composers from Mexico.

       North/South Consonance, Inc. continues its 34th consecutive season of free-admission concerts on Monday evening May 5 when Max Lifchitz celebrates the Cinco de Mayo Holiday performing a recital devoted entirely to the piano music of composers from México.

The event will start at 8 PM and will take place at the intimate and acoustically superior auditorium of Christ & St. Stephen’s Church (120 West 69th St – bet. Broadway & Columbus Ave) on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The auditorium is ADA accessible.

Admission is free (no tickets needed).

  Max Lifchitz – the Mexican-born pianist and long-time resident in New York, was described by The American Record Guide as ”a consummate musician …. one of America’s finest exponents of contemporary piano music.” The San Francisco Chronicle described him as “a stunning, ultra-sensitive pianist” while the New York Times praised him for his “clean, measured and sensitive performances. Active also as composer and conductor, Mr. Lifchitz has performed throughout Europe, Latin America and the US.

The program will feature music by 20th and 21st century Mexican composers including Carlos Chávez, Manuel Enríquez, Maria Teresa Prieto, Manuel M. Ponce and Silvestre Revueltas. The program will also feature Lifchitz’s recently completed Piano Silhouettes and the premiere of a new work by Brian Banks—the American composer who lives in the Mexican city of Puebla who will be on hand to introduce his music.

The artist is available for interviews and media event and may be contacted through the North/South office at

Since its inception in 1980, North/South Consonance has brought to the attention of the New York City public over 1,000 recent works by composers representing a wide spectrum of aesthetic views. It activities are made possible in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Brian Banks

Brian Banks


Carlos Chavez


Manuel M. Ponce


Maria Teresa Prieto


Silvestre Revueltas

For the complete concert series schedule please visit

To stream, download and/or purchase the more than 60 compact discs released under the North/South Recordings label please go to

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Lyris Quartet

Lyris Quartet

Jacaranda’s next concert, on March 8 at 8:00 p.m., will be held at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall, which is waiving admission to honor Jacaranda’s 10th anniversary. Jacaranda’s inaugural season featured an adventurous young string quartet known as Denali, which played with the series until 2010. Denali was succeeded by Lyris as quartet in residence. This free “Continental Harmony” concert will be entirely devoted to the Lyris Quartet, playing 20th-century American string quartet repertoire spanning 80 years. For the occasion, Lyris will open with their debut performance of the String Quartet No. 2 by Charles Ives (1911-13), followed by a Jacaranda signature work from 1973, String Quartet No. 4, “Amazing Grace,” by Ben Johnston. String Quartet No. 5 by Philip Glass (1991), a Lyris specialty, will be followed with String Quartet No. 3 by Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

Composed in Los Angeles at the end of WWII, Korngold’s Quartet No. 3 was performed by Denali in its final season, and will also be performed by Lyris for the first time. The quartet was premiered at UCLA Royce Hall in 1946. Fearing that his film music would be forgotten, Korngold recycled themes from “Devotion” (1943) about the Bronte Sisters, the war themed “Between Two Worlds” (1944), and the classic “The Sea Wolf” (1941) with Edward G. Robinson, Ida Lupino and John Garfield.

Jacaranda is devoting “Continental Harmony” to the string quartet, for the first time, in recognition of its importance to Jacaranda’s programming.

The UCLA Music Library will host this free concert, underwritten by the UCLA Music Library’s Christine and Hugo Davise Fund for Contemporary Music, at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall, 445 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90024.

Reservations are strongly recommended. To RSVP and for more information, please visit or call (213) 483-0216.

About Jacaranda: Jacaranda, with the motto of “music at the edge,” is a series of intimate concert adventures into the realm of new and rarely heard classical music designed to awaken curiosity, passion and discovery in diverse audiences. Founded in 2003 by arts impresario Patrick Scott and conductor/organist Mark Alan Hilt, Jacaranda produces a series (eight concerts this season) that features current and rising stars in the world of classical music performance. Celebrating its 10th anniversary, Jacaranda’s full 2013-14 season information is available at Most concerts are at First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica, 1220 Second Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401.

About The Lyris Quartet: The Lyris Quartet, described as “radiant…excellent… and powerfully engaged” by Mark Swed of the LA Times, was founded in 2008. The founding of Lyris was the culmination of years of collaboration between its members in many different ensembles throughout the Los Angeles area. The individual members of the quartet have won top prizes at such competitions as the Tchaikovsky International Competition and Aspen Music Festival as well as collaborated with renowned artists Natalia Gutman, David Geringas, Martha Argerich, Alban Gerhardt, Boris Pergamenschikov, Guillame Sutre, Myung-Whun Chung, and Richard Stoltzman.

They have collaborated with composers Steve Reich, Krystof Penderecki, Oliver Knussen, Steven Mackey, John Adams, Paquito D’Rivera, Wadada Leo Smith, Gerard Schurmann, and Billy Childs.

Lyris has appeared throughout North America, Europe, and Asia in a diverse range of ensembles including Grammy-nominated groups Absolute Ensemble and Southwest Chamber Music, and Orchestra Ensemble Kanazawa as well as solo and chamber appearances in various festivals such as Ravinia, Brahms Festival in Madrid, Music Academy of the West, Banff Centre for the Arts, Czech SommerFest, and Oregon Festival of American Music among others.

In Los Angeles, Lyris has performed at the Bing Theater at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Broad Stage, Zipper Hall at The Colburn School, Royce Hall, and Disney Hall. They opened the Long Beach Opera’s production of Janacek’s Cunning Little Vixen with a featured performance of the “Intimate Letters” quartet and performed the west coast premiere of David Lang’s “The Difficulty of Crossing a Field.” Other performances have included the South Bay Chamber Music Series, Los Angeles Music Guild, Annenberg Series, and Chamber Music Palisades. This year will mark their fourth season as the resident ensemble for the critically acclaimed series Jacaranda: Music at the Edge.

The Lyris Quartet also helps to curate the new music series “Hear Now” which helps to promote the music of Los Angeles composers. They have just completed their first album for Toccata Classics which will be released next month.

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