Posts Tagged “New York”

ACO_Rehearsal_byMichaelGellerJoin American Composers Orchestra (ACO) for its 23rd annual Underwood New Music Readings and look behind the scenes at the process involved in bringing brand new orchestral music to life. The Readings will feature new, stylistically diverse music from seven composers at the early stages of their careers: Andy Akiho (Tarnished Mirrors), Melody Eötvös (Beetles, Dragons, and Dreamers), Robert Honstein (Rise), Jared Miller (Contrasted Perspectives – Two Surrealist Portraits), Kyle Rotolo (Apophis), Harry Stafylakis (Brittle Fracture), and Wang A-Mao (Characters in Theatre).

ACO Music Director George Manahan leads the Readings, along with mentor composers ACO Artistic Director Derek Bermel, Robert Beaser, Olly Wilson, and Julia Wolfe. One composer will be chosen to receive a $15,000 commission to write a new piece for ACO to be premiered during the orchestra’s 2015-2016 season. In addition, audience members will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite pieces, and the composer chosen as the “Audience Choice” winner will be commissioned to compose an original mobile phone ringtone, available for everyone who votes.

FREE and open to the public.  Part of the inaugural NY PHIL BIENNIAL.

American Composers Orchestra’s 23rd Annual Underwood New Music Readings
The DiMenna Center for Classical Music
450 West 37th Street, NYC

Friday, June 6, 2014, 10am – Working Rehearsal
Saturday, June 7, 2014, 10am-4pm – Career Development Seminar
Saturday, June 7, 2014, 7:30pm – Run-Through

George Manahan, conductor
American Composers Orchestra
Andy Akiho: Tarnished Mirrors
Melody Eötvös: Beetles, Dragons, and Dreamers
Robert Honstein: Rise
Jared Miller: Contrasted Perspectives – Two Surrealist Portraits
Kyle Rotolo: Apophis
Harry Stafylakis: Brittle Fracture
Wang A-Mao: Characters in Theatre

ACO’s Underwood New Music Readings Ticket Information:
Admission to ACO’s Underwood New Music Readings is free, but reservations are required. The cost for the Career Development Seminar is $25, which includes lunch. Reservations for the Readings and the Seminar can be made at www.americancomposers.org/tickets.

 

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largefileMOTSSlogoNow in its 13th concert season, on its April 24th program the Music of the Spheres Society will feature music by several iconoclasts of the early 20th century: Sergei Prokofiev, Bela Bartok, Charles Ives and Camille Saint-Saens – and if you are wondering why we are including Saint-Saens, it is because he was among the first composers to write music for film, in his case “The Assassination of the Duke of Guise” in 1908.  He is also close to our hearts because of his interest and expertise in geology, archaeology, botany, lepidoptery, mathematics, acoustics, occult sciences, Roman theatre decoration, and ancient instruments. Last but not least, as a member of the Astronomical Society of France; Saint-Saens lectured on mirages, designed a telescope and planned concerts to correspond with astronomical events such as solar eclipses!

The concert features the Sonata for violin solo, op. 115 (1947) by Sergei Prokofiev; the Sonata no. 1 for violin and piano (1923) by Bela Bartok; the Largo for clarinet, violin and piano (1901, rev. 1934) by Charles Ives; and the Sonata for clarinet and piano (1921) by Camille Saint-Saens.

Violinist and Artistic Director Stephanie Chase will be joined by pianist Brian Connelly and clarinetist Jon Manasse. The concert will start at approximately 8:15 pm at Christ & St. Stephen’s Church, located at 120 West 69th Street in Manhattan.  Tickets are available at the door at $30, $20 student/senior, cash or check only.  Doors open at 7:15 pm.  Advance tickets are available through Brown Paper Tickets.

At 7:30 pm, Joseph Sherman will give what promises to be a fascinating talk on “Music Education in New York City Public Schools – 1950 to Now,” which is included in concert admission. Mr. Sherman is the founding principal of the High School for Violin and Dance in the Bronx and an avid saxophonist and violinist.  For more information, please visit www.musicofthespheres.org or call (646) 678-0391.

CRITICAL ACCLAIM

“All the basic virtuoso qualities — intonation, rhythmic accuracy, flawless phrasing, and the like — are to be heard in Jon Manasse’s playing, yet what sets him apart is his exceptionally beautiful sound. Hearing his warmth of tone in all registers is like listening to a top-class vocalist or violist. It’s radiantly gripping.” – San Francisco Classical Voice“(Stephanie Chase is) a supreme musical performer whose complete virtuosity enables her to ennoble everything she plays.” – Byron Belt, Newhouse Newspapers

“Brian Connelly is…a technically masterful and naturally gifted musician (whose) playing contained many moments of beauty and refinement.” - Peninsula Reviews

STEPHANIE CHASE is acclaimed as “one of the violin greats of our era” (Newhouse News) and excels in the virtuoso soloist’s repertoire, period instrument practice, contemporary music, chamber music, and music education. As violin soloist she has appeared with the world’s most illustrious orchestras, among them the Chicago Symphony, London Symphony and New York Philharmonic, and her playing is widely acclaimed for its “elegance, dexterity, rhythmic vitality and great imagination” (Boston Globe). Her recording of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto and Romances, the first ever on period instruments, has been declared “one of the twenty most outstanding performances in the work’s recording history” (Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Cambridge University Press) and honored with the highest possible ratings by BBC Music Magazine and Classic CD. Among Ms. Chase’s many awards are a top medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition and the Avery Fisher Career Grant. She co-founded the Music of the Spheres Society in 2001.

Among the most distinguished classical artists of his generation, clarinetist JON MANASSE is internationally recognized for his inspiring artistry, uniquely glorious sound and charismatic performing style. His solo appearances include New York City performances at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts´ Avery Fisher Hall and Alice Tully Hall, Hunter College´s Sylvia & Danny Kaye Playhouse, Columbia University, Rockefeller University and The Town Hall, fourteen tours of Japan and Southeast Asia – all with the New York Symphonic Ensemble, debuts in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and Osaka and acclaimed concerto performances with Gerard Schwarz and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, both at Lincoln Center´s Avery Fisher Hall and at the prestigious Tokyu Bunkamura Festival in Tokyo. Among the orchestras with which he has appeared as soloist are the Academy of St. Martin’s in the Fields, the Augsburg, Alabama, Dayton, Evansville, Indianapolis Symphonies, the National Philharmonic, and Canada´s Symphony Nova Scotia.

Jon Manasse appears frequently in highly praised duo concerts with pianist Jon Nakamatsu, and together they have released several recordings. Their acclaimed recording for Harmonia Mundi of the Brahms quintets for clarinet and piano, in collaboration with the Tokyo String Quartet, was released in 2012.

Pianist BRIAN CONNELLY’s performances span an unusually broad range of historical and modern repertoires. Born in Detroit, he attended the University of Michigan, where he studied with pianists Gyorgy Sandor and Theodore Lettvin. Mr. Connelly has premiered works by a host of contemporary composers such as William Albright, Karim Al-Zand, Derek Bermel, William Bolcom, Paul Cooper, David Diamond, Ross Lee Finney, and many others. He is a frequent guest with new-music groups such as the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble and the Chicago Contemporary Players, and he was recently featured in the Carnegie Hall series Making Music in a tribute to composer William Bolcom.

Known for his affinity for the works of Olivier Messiaen, Connelly’s recent performances include Messiaen’s Vingt Regards sur l’Enfant-Jésus and Catalogue d’Oiseaux for piano, the complete songs cycles with soprano Carmen Pelton and mezzo-soprano Susanne Mentzer, all of the chamber music, the Oiseaux exotiques with chamber orchestra, and the Trois petites liturgies de la Présence Divine with conductor Donald Runnicles at the Grand Teton Music Festival. Mr. Connelly is also widely respected as a scholar and performer of historical instruments, appearing in the U.S. and Europe on 18th- and 19th-century pianos by Walther, Rosenberger, Graf, Pleyel, Bösendorfer, and Streicher. He has for 13 years been a member of the renowned ensemble Context; and his recent recordings with that group—of music by Robert Schumann and Prince Louis Ferdinand—have received exuberant praise.

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miroloungecolor2013 copy Arts at The Park is pleased to announce the debut in its series of the   renowned Miró Quartet in a concert of masterpieces by Beethoven, Dutilleux and Schubert on Wednesday, March 26 at 8 PM at The Park Avenue Christian Church (known affectionately as “the Park”), 1010 Park Avenue at 85th Street in Manhattan. Tickets, available at Smarttix, are $40 Front Orchestra; $25, General Admission; and $20,Students/Seniors. The Quartet is thrilled at the opportunity to play in the acoustically rich neo-Gothic sanctuary of The Park.

Hailed by the New York Times as possessing “explosive vigor and technical finesse”, the dynamic Miró Quartet, one of America’s highestprofile chamber groups, enjoys its place at the top of the international chamber music scene. Now in its second decade, the quartet continues to captivate audiences and critics around the world with its startling intensity, fresh perspective, and mature approach. For their AATP debut performance, the Quartet will perform well-known works of Beethoven and Schubert alongside a 20th century masterwork of French composer Henri Dutilleux:

  • Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 18, No. 6, “La Malinconia” – Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
  • Ainsi la nuit – Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013)
  • Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D. 810, “Death and the Maiden” – Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

The Miró Quartet is comprised of:

About the Miró Quartet:

Founded in 1995 at the Oberlin Conservatory, the Miró Quartet met with immediate success winning first prizes at the Coleman, Fischoff, and Banff competitions as well as the prestigious Naumburg Chamber Music Award. The Miró Quartet was also a recipient of the Cleveland Quartet Award and was the first ensemble ever to be awarded the Avery Fisher Career Grant. Since then, the Miró Quartet has performed throughout the world in important venues such as Carnegie Hall, the Concertgebouw, the Berlin Philharmonic’s Kammermusikaal, and the Konzerthaus in Vienna.

The Miró Quartet has collaborated with such artists as Leif Ove Andsnes, Joshua Bell, Eliot Fisk, Lynn Harrell, Midori, Jon Kimura Parker and Pinchas Zukerman. A favorite of numerous summer festivals, the Quartet has appeared regularly at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, Chamber Music Northwest, La Jolla Summerfest, Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival, and the White Pine Festival.

Concert highlights of recent seasons include a highly anticipated and sold out return to Carnegie Hall to perform Beethoven’s complete Opus 59 Quartets (which they also recorded); collaborations with award-winning actor Stephen Dillane as part of Lincoln Center’s White Light Festival; and festival appearances at Chamber Music Northwest, Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival, Music@Menlo, and Ottawa ChamberFest.

The Miró Quartet has been heard on numerous national and international radio broadcasts, including National Public Radio’s Performance Today and Minnesota Public Radio’s Saint Paul Sunday. In addition, the Quartet has released numerous recordings, most recently the Op. 18 Quartets of Beethoven on the Vanguard Classics label. The Quartet’s recording of George Crumb’s Black Angels won the prestigious FrenchDiapason d’Or” prize.

Arts at The Park, a component of the Park Avenue Christian Church (known as “The Park”), brings together outstanding performers and ensembles from the greater New York City metropolitan area for programs that enrich and inspire and that touch our shared human story and experience. Arts at The Park include live music, theater, political and theological discourse, and family and holiday events. Artistic Director of Arts at The Park is Paul Vasile.

 

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On Sunday, January 12 at 3 PM, the Grammy nominated North/South Chamber Orchestra under the direction of its founder composer/conductor Max Lifchitz welcomes the New Year with a free-admission concert featuring works by composers from Europe and the Americas

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On Friday, December 13, 2013 at 8 pm, the New York City Master Chorale, under the direction of Artistic Director Thea Kano, opens its eighth season with a “Holiday Concert,” featuring Camille Saint-Saëns’ Christmas Oratorio and the New York City premiere of Paul Leavitt’s Magnificat. The concert, to be held at the Church of Saint Ignatius of Antioch (552 West End Avenue at 87th Street), features organist James Kennerley and phenomenal soloists from the Chorale. Tickets are $35 (general admission) or $25 (student/senior) and can be purchased atwww.nycmasterchorale.org or at the door, space permitting.

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Digital Download & 7” Vinyl Release Date: October 15, 2013
Vinyl Available Exclusively at: www.christopherbono.com

VIDEO: The Inspiration Behind Unity & The Unexcelled Mantra
http://bit.ly/UnityMantraVideo

On October 15, 2013, composer Christopher Bono releases two new singles, Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra, performed by The New York Virtuoso Singers led by music director Harold Rosenbaum. These choral works will be available on Bono’s label Our Silent Canvas, distributed digitally by Naxos and released on limited edition 7” vinyl. The recordings were made at the American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York by Grammy-winning producer Silas Brown.

Visual artist DZO Olivier has created original illustrations for the cover art for Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra recordings, intimately influenced by Bono’s music and the concepts it explores. Videos inspired by these works created by film artists Tobias Stretch (Radiohead, Deftones) and Ingibjörg Birgisdóttir (Sigur Rós) will be released on November 5, 2013.

Bono describes Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra as contemplating the search for a modern form of spirituality. He says, “Both works explore a path to transcendence or ‘true being’ through union with the cosmos – The Unexcelled Mantra from a Mahayana Buddhist point of view and Unity from the Western philosophical tradition of Plato.”

Unity is a choral piece based on some of the musical and philosophical concepts of Plato’s Republic. The chosen text was taken from a section of the Republic in which Plato discusses the power of mathematics, but Bono immediately saw it could also be viewed as a metaphor for the phenomenon of meditation. He says, “This multi-dimensional observation was a key inspiration for me when writing the work, both considering the mathematical qualities of music and the esoteric concepts of achieving union with the All.” In addition, Bono experimented with the power Plato claimed existed in the Dorian and Phrygian modes. According to Plato, the Dorian would “fittingly imitate the utterances and accents of a brave man who is engaged in warfare,” while the Phrygian was suitable “for a man engaged in works of peace.”

The Unexcelled Mantra is a setting of text from the Heart Sutra, a sacred text in Mahayana Buddhism on understanding Shunyata, or Emptiness, in order to realize Nirvana. The mantra reads “gaté gaté paragaté parasamgaté bodhi svaha,” which can be translated as “Go, go, go beyond, go totally beyond, be rooted in the ground of enlightenment.”

The release of Unity and The Unexcelled Mantra follows Bono’s first classical album, Invocations, a chamber music collection released in fall 2012 and on vinyl in August 2013. The originality and inventiveness of Invocations was noted by composer and writer Frank Oteri in NewMusicBox, who wrote, “While much of 21st-century contemporary composition is not beholden to any rules, to the extent that I could probably claim everyone to be an ‘outsider’ in some ways, Bono’s music sounds as though everything he writes is something he is discovering for the very first time, even if there are clear reference points throughout to the sound worlds of other composers from both our own time and other eras.”

Christopher Bono entered the world of classical music much later than most of his contemporaries. He spent his childhood and teenage years devoted to baseball; in 1999 he was drafted by the Seattle Mariners but an injury kept him from playing. Filling the void left by the end of his athletic endeavors, Bono began playing the guitar when he was 21, and for several years he toured, recorded, and performed in an alternative roots-rock style. In his mid-20s, he made the choice to learn classical composition techniques in order to more fully realize his music. For seven years, in nearly hermetic isolation, he taught himself to read music, and studied composition independently with Juilliard professor Kendall Briggs and at La Scola Cantorum in Paris.

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A concert of works by renowned American composer Michael Hersch will be presented at the DiMenna Center for the Arts in New York City on the evening of October 19.

Photograph by Richard Anderson.

Photograph by Richard Anderson.

Also regarded as one of today’s more formidable pianists, Hersch is the subject of a new documentary film, The Sudden Pianist, which focuses on his life and his work for the piano. At the Oct 19 concert, Hersch will perform some of the music featured in the film: selections from his 2 and a half-hour solo piano work, The Vanishing Pavilions. (A screening of the film, which was released earlier in 2013 and has already garnered significant festival interest, will take place at the Producers’ Club on the morning of the concert; more information about the film can be found at thesuddenpianist.com.) This concert marks Hersch’s only second public appearance as a pianist in New York in the last ten years.

Also on the October 19 all-Hersch program will be “in the snowy margins” for unaccompanied violin; the New York premiere of “of ages manifest” for unaccompanied alto saxophone; Five Fragments for unaccompanied violin; and the New York premiere of How Far the Cradle for soprano and piano. Artists joining the composer on the program are violinist Miranda Cuckson, saxophonist Gary Louie, soprano Ah Young Hong, and pianist Michael Sheppard.

Saturday, October 19 at 8pm
The DiMenna Center for Classical Music
Mary Flagler Cary Hall
450 West 37th Street
New York, NY 10018

Free admission. No reservations required.
For more information, visit here.

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Don’t miss the 1st concert of the Greenwich Village Orchestra’s 2012/2013 season!

WHEN: Sunday, December 2, 2012 at 3pm.

PROGRAM: Concert features Sibelius’s “Symphony No. 2,” Smetana’s “The Moldau,” and Mendelssohn’s “Violin Concerto” with violinist Aaron Boyd. Meet the musicians afterward at a free reception!

ABOUT THE ORCHESTRA: The Greenwich Village Orchestra, founded by local musicians in 1986, is YOUR neighborhood orchestra. We have captivated audiences and critics alike with world-class soloists and emotionally charged concerts for 26 years.

TICKET INFORMATION: All GVO concerts are by suggested donation of $15 ($10 for students/seniors). Tickets may be purchased online at www.gvo.org or at the door on the day of the concert.

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Join us for Cantori’s ’12-13 Season Opener!

The US premiere of Felix und Clara by Dutch composer Jacques Bank explores the troubled relationship of Clara Schumann and her son Felix. The chorus sings the voice of Felix, and renowned New York stage actor Kathleen Chalfant (Angels in America; Wit) takes the role of Clara. Also on the program: the world premiere of Four Songs by Frank Brickle, setting an unusual collection of texts by four 20th-century American poets within the throbbing soundscape of a string quartet; and Libby Larsen’s Alaska Spring. Featuring the Cassatt String Quartet and saxophonist Timothy Ruedeman.

November 3, 2012
8:00 p.m.
Church of St. Luke in the Fields
487 Hudson Street, NYC
Click for tickets

Cantori New York, praised by The New York Times for its “spirit of exploration” and “virtuosity and assurance,” celebrates its 28th season of programming featuring new and neglected works that deserve to be performed and heard.

A three-time winner of the ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, Cantori has built a strong reputation for artistic excellence and innovative programming, including an evening of theatrical choral music with Tony Award winner Maryann Plunkett. Cantori’s collaborators have included the Cassatt String Quartet, Prism Saxophone Quartet, and the Gregg Smith Singers; appearances have included the opening season of Zankel Hall with Michael Tilson Thomas, Great Performers at Lincoln Center, and World Financial Center Arts & Events.

www.cantorinewyork.com

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Photo by Jay Blakesberg.

Tomorrow, at the PEN World Voices Festival’s featured event at the Met Museum, Kronos Quartet will provide musical accompaniment to writers Tony Kushner, Marjane Satrapi, and Rula Jebreal as they read from selections of their own work. The authors will then listen and respond to pieces in which recorded voices are juxtaposed with music. It promises to be an intriguing colloquy of literary and musical leading lights.

The Kronos Quartet: Exit Strategies

The Kronos Quartet (David Harrington, violin; John Sherba, violin; Hank Dutt, viola; Jeffrey Zeigler, cello) in performance with Tony Kushner, Marjane Satrapi, Rula Jebreal.

Works by Laurie Anderson, Hamza El Din, Morton Feldman, Ram Narayan,

Terry Riley, Omar Souleyman, and Ramallah Underground

When: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 at 7pm

Where: The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street
4, 5, 6 trains to 86th Street, walk west

Tickets: $30/$20 students and available at www.metmuseum.org/tickets or (212) 570-3949

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