Posts Tagged “piano”

largefileMOTSSlogoNow in its 13th concert season, on its April 24th program the Music of the Spheres Society will feature music by several iconoclasts of the early 20th century: Sergei Prokofiev, Bela Bartok, Charles Ives and Camille Saint-Saens – and if you are wondering why we are including Saint-Saens, it is because he was among the first composers to write music for film, in his case “The Assassination of the Duke of Guise” in 1908.  He is also close to our hearts because of his interest and expertise in geology, archaeology, botany, lepidoptery, mathematics, acoustics, occult sciences, Roman theatre decoration, and ancient instruments. Last but not least, as a member of the Astronomical Society of France; Saint-Saens lectured on mirages, designed a telescope and planned concerts to correspond with astronomical events such as solar eclipses!

The concert features the Sonata for violin solo, op. 115 (1947) by Sergei Prokofiev; the Sonata no. 1 for violin and piano (1923) by Bela Bartok; the Largo for clarinet, violin and piano (1901, rev. 1934) by Charles Ives; and the Sonata for clarinet and piano (1921) by Camille Saint-Saens.

Violinist and Artistic Director Stephanie Chase will be joined by pianist Brian Connelly and clarinetist Jon Manasse. The concert will start at approximately 8:15 pm at Christ & St. Stephen’s Church, located at 120 West 69th Street in Manhattan.  Tickets are available at the door at $30, $20 student/senior, cash or check only.  Doors open at 7:15 pm.  Advance tickets are available through Brown Paper Tickets.

At 7:30 pm, Joseph Sherman will give what promises to be a fascinating talk on “Music Education in New York City Public Schools – 1950 to Now,” which is included in concert admission. Mr. Sherman is the founding principal of the High School for Violin and Dance in the Bronx and an avid saxophonist and violinist.  For more information, please visit www.musicofthespheres.org or call (646) 678-0391.

CRITICAL ACCLAIM

“All the basic virtuoso qualities — intonation, rhythmic accuracy, flawless phrasing, and the like — are to be heard in Jon Manasse’s playing, yet what sets him apart is his exceptionally beautiful sound. Hearing his warmth of tone in all registers is like listening to a top-class vocalist or violist. It’s radiantly gripping.” – San Francisco Classical Voice“(Stephanie Chase is) a supreme musical performer whose complete virtuosity enables her to ennoble everything she plays.” – Byron Belt, Newhouse Newspapers

“Brian Connelly is…a technically masterful and naturally gifted musician (whose) playing contained many moments of beauty and refinement.” - Peninsula Reviews

STEPHANIE CHASE is acclaimed as “one of the violin greats of our era” (Newhouse News) and excels in the virtuoso soloist’s repertoire, period instrument practice, contemporary music, chamber music, and music education. As violin soloist she has appeared with the world’s most illustrious orchestras, among them the Chicago Symphony, London Symphony and New York Philharmonic, and her playing is widely acclaimed for its “elegance, dexterity, rhythmic vitality and great imagination” (Boston Globe). Her recording of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto and Romances, the first ever on period instruments, has been declared “one of the twenty most outstanding performances in the work’s recording history” (Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Cambridge University Press) and honored with the highest possible ratings by BBC Music Magazine and Classic CD. Among Ms. Chase’s many awards are a top medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition and the Avery Fisher Career Grant. She co-founded the Music of the Spheres Society in 2001.

Among the most distinguished classical artists of his generation, clarinetist JON MANASSE is internationally recognized for his inspiring artistry, uniquely glorious sound and charismatic performing style. His solo appearances include New York City performances at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts´ Avery Fisher Hall and Alice Tully Hall, Hunter College´s Sylvia & Danny Kaye Playhouse, Columbia University, Rockefeller University and The Town Hall, fourteen tours of Japan and Southeast Asia – all with the New York Symphonic Ensemble, debuts in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and Osaka and acclaimed concerto performances with Gerard Schwarz and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, both at Lincoln Center´s Avery Fisher Hall and at the prestigious Tokyu Bunkamura Festival in Tokyo. Among the orchestras with which he has appeared as soloist are the Academy of St. Martin’s in the Fields, the Augsburg, Alabama, Dayton, Evansville, Indianapolis Symphonies, the National Philharmonic, and Canada´s Symphony Nova Scotia.

Jon Manasse appears frequently in highly praised duo concerts with pianist Jon Nakamatsu, and together they have released several recordings. Their acclaimed recording for Harmonia Mundi of the Brahms quintets for clarinet and piano, in collaboration with the Tokyo String Quartet, was released in 2012.

Pianist BRIAN CONNELLY’s performances span an unusually broad range of historical and modern repertoires. Born in Detroit, he attended the University of Michigan, where he studied with pianists Gyorgy Sandor and Theodore Lettvin. Mr. Connelly has premiered works by a host of contemporary composers such as William Albright, Karim Al-Zand, Derek Bermel, William Bolcom, Paul Cooper, David Diamond, Ross Lee Finney, and many others. He is a frequent guest with new-music groups such as the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble and the Chicago Contemporary Players, and he was recently featured in the Carnegie Hall series Making Music in a tribute to composer William Bolcom.

Known for his affinity for the works of Olivier Messiaen, Connelly’s recent performances include Messiaen’s Vingt Regards sur l’Enfant-Jésus and Catalogue d’Oiseaux for piano, the complete songs cycles with soprano Carmen Pelton and mezzo-soprano Susanne Mentzer, all of the chamber music, the Oiseaux exotiques with chamber orchestra, and the Trois petites liturgies de la Présence Divine with conductor Donald Runnicles at the Grand Teton Music Festival. Mr. Connelly is also widely respected as a scholar and performer of historical instruments, appearing in the U.S. and Europe on 18th- and 19th-century pianos by Walther, Rosenberger, Graf, Pleyel, Bösendorfer, and Streicher. He has for 13 years been a member of the renowned ensemble Context; and his recent recordings with that group—of music by Robert Schumann and Prince Louis Ferdinand—have received exuberant praise.

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On Sunday, March 9 at 3 pm, Mexican born pianist Juan Pablo Horcasitas will host a CD Release Party for his first solo album “Among Songs and Dances” in the Benay Benuta Hall at Lighthouse Guild, 111 East 59th Street, New York (Directions and Map). “Among Songs and Dances” includes music from Bach to Zyman creating a beautiful journey through original and arranged songs and dances for the piano. Works include those by Samuel Zyman, Manuel M. Ponce, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Astor Piazzolla, Franz Schubert, Johann S. Bach, José Pablo Moncayo and Ricardo Castro.

The event features a performance by Mr. Horcasitas followed by a conversation with producer Juan Pablo Mantilla, composer Samuel Zyman of The Juilliard School, and Caterina Toscano of the Mexican Cultural Institute. Wine and hors d’oeuvres as well as a CD signing conclude the party.

This CD project is Mr. Horcasitas’s first studio recording. Having performed in many places around the world for the last 15 years, Mr. Horcasitas felt inspired to create a professional CD with some of his favorite pieces in his repertoire.

The eight pieces Mr. Horcasitas selected for recording all relate in some way to “song” or “dance”- hence, the title of the CD.  From Busoni’s transcription of Bach’s Chacone in D minor for solo violin to Heitor Villa-lobos “Festa no sertao” from his Ciclo Brasileiro, featuring the batuca rhythm, this album will portray the way composers from different countries have interpreted these two styles.

In addition to producer Juan Pablo Mantilla, Mr. Horcasitas also collaborated with noted audio engineer Ryan Streber at Oktaven Audio. The recording itself was made possible by the support of 83 backers of a Kickstarter campaign.

A portion of the CD sales will benefit Lighthouse International, a beacon of hope for the visually challenged, and where Mr. Horcasitas is a faculty member at the  Lighthouse’s Filomen M. D’Agostino Greenberg Music School (the only community music school in the country for those visually impaired). Mr. Horcasitas recently served as the pianist for the School’s acclaimed production of Benjamin Britten’s Noye’s Fludde (see the New York Times review). A resident of New York, Mr. Horcasitas received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degree at the Manhattan School of Music under the guidance of Nina Svetlanova. He has an active career as a soloist as well as a collaborative pianist.

The March 9th CD Release event is made possible with the support of Lighthouse Guild and the Mexican Consulate General in New York.

 

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On Sunday, March 16 at 2 pm, pianist Inna Faliks (www.innafaliks.com) will perform her eclectic program Dances and Passions at New York City’s Spectrum, 121 Ludlow (Floor 2, ring bell for 2), New York. In addition to Beethoven’s well-regarded Piano Sonata No. 23 (Appassionata), Faliks will also play the composer’s Polonaise, Op. 89 and Schumann’s Davidsbündler, Op. 6. Works by Shchedrin and New York City’s Ljova (Lev Zhurbin) complete the program. This will be Faliks’ first appearance at Spectrum.

Tickets are $15 general admission; $10 students and seniors. More information is available at http://spectrumnyc.com/blog/.

A resident of Los Angeles and past New Yorker, Faliks now serves as a tenured professor of piano at UCLA’s  Herb Albert School of Music. She is also the founder of New York’s Music/Words.

COMPLETE PROGRAM:

Beethoven, Polonaise, Op. 89/Sonata, Op. 57 (Appassionata)

(Intermission)

Shchedrin, Basso Ostinato
Ljova
, Sirota (with historical recording)
Schumann, Davidsbündler, Op. 6

Called “adventurous” and “passionate” by The New Yorker, Ukrainian-born Inna Faliks (www.innafaliks.com) has established herself as one of the most passionately committed, exciting and poetic artists of her generation. Since her acclaimed teenage debuts at the Gilmore Festival and with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, she has performed on many of the world’s great stages, with numerous orchestras, in solo appearances, and with conductors such as Leonard Slatkin and Keith Lockhart.

She recently appeared alongside British actress Lesley Nicol (“Mrs. Patmore” from Downton Abbey) in Nigel Hess’s production of Admission: One Shilling, a staged tribute to the legendary Dame Myra Hess. Her critically acclaimed CD on MSR Classics, Sound of Verse, was released in 2009, featuring music of Boris Pasternak, Rachmaninoff and Ravel. Her discography also includes a recital recording for the Yamaha Disklavier library, and her new Beethoven recording will be out this year. Faliks recently joined the illustrious faculty of UCLA,

 

 

 

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Adam Tendler

Adam Tendler


Jacaranda’s 10th anniversary season continues on Saturday, February 22, 2014 with a dinner break — a break that separates the performances of two 20-movement mid-twentieth-century masterworks by John Cage and Olivier Messiaen. Each cycle is played by an American pianist with whom the music has become synonymous: Adam Tendler and Christopher Taylor, respectively. The consecutive concerts (Tendler at 5:00 p.m. and Taylor at 7:30 p.m.) will take place at First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica, 1220 Second Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401.
Jacaranda’s first decade gave extensive attention to the centenaries of Messiaen (1908-92) and Cage (1912-89). As a nod to that legacy, artistic director Patrick Scott chose for the 10th anniversary two works for solo piano that link the composers after World War II: Cage’s “Sonatas & Interludes” (1946-48) for prepared piano, and Messiaen’s “Vingt Regards sur l’Enfant Jesus” (1944). Both works were influenced in very different ways by the philosophy and music of India. Cage performed his cycle for Messiaen in Paris in 1949, and Messiaen reciprocated with a performance of his cycle by Yvonne Loriod, the work’s extravagantly talented dedicatee, who would eventually become Messiaen’s wife.
Tendler, described as “an exuberantly expressive pianist” who “vividly displayed his enthusiasm for every phrase” by Los Angeles Times music critic Mark Swed, will perform the 60-minute Cage work at 5 p.m. without pause and from memory. Recognized by the American Pianists Association, Tendler has performed modern American piano music in all of the United States.
After a dinner break, Taylor, bronze medalist at the 1993 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition and called “one of the most impressive young pianists on the horizon today” by the Washington Post, will perform the two-hour Messiaen work from memory at 7:30 p.m. with an intermission. Taylor’s “…blazing performance of Messiaen’s [''Twenty Ways of Looking at the Infant Jesus'']… is likely to stand as a point of reference for many seasons to come,” wrote the Boston Globe.
The massive piano masterpiece has additional significance for Jacaranda. Messiaen’s work was the centerpiece of a one-off, three-concert celebration organized in 2002 by series founders Scott and Mark Alan Hilt to observe the 10th anniversary of the composer’s death. The mini-festival’s location was First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica, where Hilt would soon be appointed Music Director. The enterprise grabbed the attention of the Los Angeles Times’ Swed, who noted that, while there had been an abundance of Messiaen tributes in the world’s major cities, only the enterprising duo ventured a Southern California tribute. Nine months later, Jacaranda was born.
General admission tickets for either of the February 22 Cage/Tendler or Messiaen/Taylor concerts alone are $35; $20 for students. Admission to both concerts is $60; $30 for students. For tickets and a restaurant guide, as well as special Jacaranda food and beverage discounts, go to jacarandamusic.org. Tickets are sold online or at the door. Information: (213) 483-0216.
March 8, 2014: “Continental Harmony” at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall:
Jacaranda’s next concert, on March 8, will be held at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall, which is waiving admission to honor Jacaranda’s 10th anniversary. This “Continental Harmony” concert will be entirely devoted to the 20th-century American string quartet repertoire, to be played by the Lyris Quartet. Lyris will open with Quartet No. 2 by Charles Ives followed by a Jacaranda signature work, Quartet No. 4, “Amazing Grace,” by Ben Johnston. Quartet No. 5 by Philip Glass, a Lyris specialty, will be followed with Quartet No. 3 by Erich Wolfgang Korngold.
The UCLA Music Library will host this free concert, underwritten by the UCLA Music Library’s Hugo Davise Fund for Contemporary Music, at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall, 445 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90024.
About Jacaranda: Jacaranda, with the motto of “music at the edge,” is a series of intimate concert adventures into the realm of new and rarely heard classical music designed to awaken curiosity, passion and discovery in diverse audiences. Founded in 2003 by arts impresario Patrick Scott and conductor/organist Mark Alan Hilt, Jacaranda produces a series (eight concerts this season) that features current and rising stars in the world of classical music performance. Celebrating its 10th anniversary, Jacaranda’s full 2013-14 season information is available at jacarandamusic.org. Most concerts are at First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica, 1220 Second Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401. For information or to purchase tickets go to jacarandamusic.org.

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The New Public York Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center is pleased to present American-Armenian award winning pianist Sofya Melikyan in a solo concert titled “Fantasies” on Saturday, January 25th at 2:30 pm at the Bruno Walter Auditorium in the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center located at 40 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York (map and directions). The concert, which represents the American debut of Ms. Melikyan’s Fantasies program, is free and open to the public.

 

Featuring some of the most inspired pages of the Fantasy and reflecting the different esthetics of this genre starting with the 18th century and through the present day, the concert program includes works by C.P.E. Bach, Brahms, Beethoven, Corigliano, and Liszt. The term “Fantasy” was first used in the 16th century to describe an instrumental piece that was improvisatory and spontaneous in character, free of any formal rules or restrictions. This musical journey invites listeners to dive into a universe full of colors and mystery, and in turn, to explore the fascinating world of dreams and the imagination.

Pianist Sofya Melikyan

Pianist Sofya Melikyan

…”The Armenian pianist Sofya Melikyan literally abducted her audience into the land of fantasy… She offered a fascinating panorama of different approaches – baroque, classic, romantic – to the genre of the fantasy, which in its quality and in the pervasion of the compositions would have been worthy of her home town New York”… Frederik Wittenberg in Westfälische Nachrichten  (Germany)

 

Ms. Melikyan possesses this transcendental force to take the listener to her world of deep poetic intuition and her homeland is the source of the wideness and the depth of her artistic work: she grew up in Armenia, a country characterized by a strong relationship to nature, to the mystical, surrounded by mountains, which lead for centuries the way to Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Now a resident of Brooklyn, New York, Ms. Melikyan completed her studies at the Royal Conservatory of Madrid with Joaquin Soriano, École Normale de Musique de Paris with Ramzi Yassa and the Manhattan School of Music in New York where she was a scholarship student of Solomon Mikowsky. Other pianists who have mentored her are Brigitte Engerer, Galina Eguiazarova and Elena Tatulyan. Ms. Melikyan has toured throughout Europe, Australia, Canada, Japan and the United States.  More information is available here.

The full concert program follows:

Carl Phillip Emmanuel Bach (1714-1788)

Fantasy in f sharp minor H300

 

Johannes Brahms (1836-1897)

Fantasien Op.116

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Fantasy in g minor Op. 77

John Corigliano (1938- )

Etude–Fantasy

For the left hand

Legato

Fifths to thirds

Ornaments

Melody

 

Franz Liszt (1811-1886)

Après une lecture du Dante, fantasia quasi sonata S 161,

de Anées de Pèlegrinage.

Deuxième année: Italia

 

 

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RighteousGIRLS @ Somethin' JazzRighteousGIRLS
Gina Izzo, flute +
Erika Dohi, piano

feat. Vasko Duvoski, clarinet; Fung Chern Hwei, violin; Adam Fisher, cello; Mika Godbole, vibraphone; Peter Kronreif, drums.

Saturday, November 16th 7:00pm
Somethin’ Jazz Club
212 East 52nd Street
NY, NY 10022
$10/$8 students

Flutist Gina Izzo and pianist Erika Dohi will embrace the modern as RighteousGIRLS on Saturday, November 16th 7pm, at the Somethin’ Jazz Club in NYC. RighteousGIRLS will feature classical/contemporary, jazz and electronic artists including Vijay Iyer, Ambrose Akinmusire, Pascal Le Boeuf and a premiere of Dave Molk’s “EDGE” from their upcoming album.

The program also highlights Andy Akiho’s “to wALk Or ruN in wEst harlem,” a challenging, fast paced piece driven by a personal experience Akiho had while walking home alone one night. The piece is scored for Pierrot ensemble with added drum set and vibraphone. Joining the RighteousGIRLS will be Vasko Duvoski, clarinet; Fung Chern Hwei, violin; Adam Fisher, cello; Mika Godbole, vibraphone; Peter Kronreif drums. For more information please visit www.RighteousGIRLS.com.

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INTERNATIONAL NEW MUSIC COLLABORATION TO SHED LIGHT ON HUMAN SUFFERING
May 8, 10, 11 2013 @7PM at Conrady Prebys Music Center – Experimental Theater
University of California, San Diego
WWW.CUATROCORRIDOS.COM

A chamber opera addressing human trafficking along the San Diego border to premiere at University of California, San Diego at the Conrad Prebys Music Center.

Based on true events, Cuatro Corridos tells the story of four women whose lives are scarred by human trafficking and represents an unprecedented collaboration between internationally acclaimed creative artists.

Led by Grammy Award winning soprano Susan Narucki and noted Mexican author Jorge Volpi, the fully- staged production features original music by four distinguished composers. Each gives voice to one of the four female characters by presenting one act in the hour-long drama.

Cuatro Corridos received generous support from UC MEXUS, the MAP Fund for the Performing Arts (Doris Duke Charitable Foundation), Yellow Barn Music Festival, and the Department of Music at UCSD.

DSC03575

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On Monday, April 22, 2013 at 7:30 PM, the critically acclaimed Momenta Quartet (Emilie-Anne Gendron and Adda Kridler, violins; Stephanie Griffin, viola; Michael Haas, cello) will join pianist Molly Morkoski in a concert celebrating a diverse array of works by Jewish composers at the Center for Jewish History (15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011; www.cjh.org).

Tickets: $15 general, $10 for seniors, students, and CJH/AJHS/YUM members with ID. Available at the door or online through http://www.cjh.org/event/2216.

The program, which features Momenta members in a range of collaborative capacities, underlines the quartet’s core tradition of championing living composers. “Sirius” (2012), a new piano quartet by Yeshiva faculty member David Glaser, will receive its New York premiere. Momenta members will be joined by pianist Molly Morkoski, whose playing has been critically hailed as “outstanding” by The Boston Globe and “exhilarating” by the American Record Guide. Momenta violist Stephanie Griffin will take the stage in “Malekhamoves” (2009), a solo work by the ClevelaMomenta Quartetnd-based composer Timothy Beyer.

The program also highlights an eclectic assortment of underrepresented 20th-century works. Momenta will draw from its unique personal repertoire for the evening’s featured string quartet selection, Stefan Wolpe’s aphoristic “Twelve Pieces for String Quartet” (1950). Seldom performed today, this ephemeral collection of character pieces totals less than 7 minutes. In contrast, Morkoski and Momenta violinist Emilie-Anne Gendron will present Aaron Copland’s lush and expansive Violin Sonata (1944), composed as a wartime memorial piece. Rounding out the program is Darius Milhaud’s jazz-infused piano-quintet suite “La création du monde,” op.81b (1922-23), a musical souvenir of the French composer’s trip to New York at the height of the Jazz Age.

This concert marks Momenta’s 5th concert appearance at the Center for Jewish History and its 4th year as the Bernice Diener Ensemble-in-Residence at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women.

For more information, contact Emilie-Anne Gendron at emilie@momentaquartet.com.

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On February 15, Van Cliburn gold medalist Jon Nakamatsu - in his only NYC appearance this season – returns to perform chamber music with clarinetist Jon Manasse, cellist Bion Tsang and violinist/Artistic Director Stephanie Chase.

Jon Manasse and Jon Nakamatsu

Jon Manasse and Jon Nakamatsu

This program features music by Beethoven, Poulenc and Dvorak that reflects on life and its necessities, friendship, and nationalism.  It will take place at Christ & St. Stephen’s Church, located at 120 West 69th Street in New York City.  The concert will start at 8:15 and is preceded by a talk at 7:30.

BEETHOVEN – Trio for piano, clarinet and cello, Op. 11
POULENC – Sonata for clarinet and piano, FP184
DVORAK – Piano Trio No. 4 “Dumky”

Beethoven’s delightful trio is partly inspired by a popular Viennese song containing the phrase “Before I go to work, I need something to eat.”

Dedicated to his friend Arthur Honegger, a fellow member of Les Six, Poulenc’s Sonata was commissioned by jazz great Benny Goodman, who premiered it (after Poulenc’s sudden death in 1963) with pianist Leonard Bernstein.

The word “Dumky” refers to the dumka, or an epic ballad of a somber nature containing contrasting cheerful sections.  Dvorak’s “Dumky Trio” is among his most beloved chamber music compositions and dates from 1891.Admission at door: $30, $20 student/senior, cash or check only.  Doors open at 7:15 p.m.  Advance tickets are available at Brown Paper Tickets.

For more information, visit the Music of the Spheres Society.

 

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On January 15, Grand Band performs Simeon ten Holt’s Canto Ostinato, the sprawling minimalist masterpiece for multiple pianos in a concert at (le) poisson rouge memorializing the composer’s recent death. The evening-length work is a complex tapestry of repetitive layers strung together in a flexible structure, ensuring that no two performances are alike– in the words of Ton van Asseldonk, his ‘compositions are not just single works, but rather a collection of an infinite number of compositions, all hidden in a single written code.’ With this performance of his most famous work, the six pianists of Grand Band pay homage to this creative genius who was at his best when writing for multiple pianos.

Grand Band is NYC’s New Music Piano Sextet. This unique ensemble has been described as a ‘supergroup of soloists’ (The Glass) and has garnered praise for delivering electrifying performances of new and contemporary music for six pianos. Making its debut at the Bang on a Can Marathon in a headlining performance of Steve Reich’s epic Six Pianos, the ensemble has been in increasing demand. Following a performance at (le) poisson rouge last summer, the New York Times declared that Grand Band consists of ‘six of the finest, busiest pianists active in New York’s contemporary-classical scene’ and that the group was a ‘rousing new ensemble.

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Tues, Jan 15
7:30 PM

Grand Band performs Canto Ostinato

in a Memorial Concert for

Simeon ten Holt

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Complete info and tickets available here:

http://www.lepoissonrouge.com/lpr_events/grand-band-jan-15th-2013/

GRAND BAND is:

Vicky Chow
David Friend
Paul Kerekes
Blair McMillen
Lisa Moore
Isabelle O’Connell

http://grandbandnyc.blogspot.com/

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