Composer Concordance Festival Starts Friday

Celebrating the “Growing Diversity of Music,” Composers Concordance, a new music consortium and record label, presents its second festival from Nov. 30 – Dec. 7. Over the course of five concerts, one will get to hear works in a variety of styles and different forces: electroacoustic, chamber music, amplified ensemble music, and works for chamber orchestra.

On Friday the 30th, CC joins forces with Vox Novus, presenting a “60X60″ mix of one-minute electroacoustic works. I just learned on Monday that my “Gilgamesh Variation” is one of the pieces in the mix. The show is at Spectrum (details below).

Festival Details

Concert #1: 60 x 60
Instrumentation: Electronic Music / Multimedia
60 Electronic Composers
Friday, November 30th at 8pm at Spectrum
121 Ludlow Street, 2nd floor, NYC – Tickets $10

Concert #2: Soli
Instrumentation: Solo
Kathleen Supové, Eleonor Sandresky, & Jed Distler
Saturday, December 1st at 7pm at Faust Harrison Pianos
207 West 58th Street, NYC
Free Event – Note: seating is limited. RSVP: info@faustharrisonpianos.com 

Concert #3: Composers Play Composers Marathon
Instrumentation: Solo, Duo, Trio
30 Composer-Performers
Sunday, December 2nd from 3pm to 7pm at Drom NYC
85 Avenue A, NYC
Tickets $15 (includes one drink)

Concert #4: Nine Live
Instrumentation: Ensemble
Composers Concordance Ensemble
Tuesday, December 4th at 7:30pm at Shapeshifter Lab
18 Whitwell Place, Brooklyn
Tickets $10

Concert #5: Legends
Instrumentation: Chamber Orchestra
Composers Concordance Chamber Orchestra (CCCO), Lara St. John – violin, Valerie Coleman – flute, Thomas Carlo Bo – conductor
Friday, December 7th at 8pm at DiMenna Center – Mary Flagler Cary Hall
450 West 37th Street, NYC
$20 day of performance, $15 students and advance tickets
Tickets: http://ccco_evolution.eventbrite.com/

Monday: NJPE Premieres works by Morris and Jarvis

The New Music Series at William Paterson University has long been one of the most interesting musical destinations in the Garden State. On Monday, November 26th, its director, Peter Jarvis, along with the New Jersey Percussion Ensemble and guest pianist Taka Kigawa, present an ambitious evening of music that includes works by leading lights Boulez, Ligeti, Babbitt, Carter, and Stravinsky. In addition, 21st century composers Daniel Levitan, Evan Hause, and Gene Pritsker are also represented on the program.

If that weren’t enough, the concert features two premieres. Jarvis conducts his Concerto for Vibraphone and Percussion Sextet; WPU faculty member John Ferrari will play the solo part. Guest composer Robert Morris has contributed another pocket concerto for percussion ensemble to the proceedings. His Stream Runner (2007), written for marimba soloist Payton MacDonald (also a member of WPU’s faculty). will conclude the evening.

Event Details

Monday, Nov. 26, 2012
7:30 PM in Shea Center’s
Shea Auditorium
Suggested contribution $5
(Free for students)

William Paterson University
College of Arts & Communication
Department of Music
present
New Music Series
Peter Jarvis, Director
music
with guests
Robert Morris – Composer
Taka Kigawa – Pianist
and featuring
The New Jersey Percussion Ensemble
with soloists
John Ferrari, Payton MacDonald, and Peter Jarvis

Righteous Girls Rescheduled to 1/14

Thrilled that Gina Izzo and Erika Dohi haven’t had their Righteous Girls performance at Cornelia Street Cafe thwarted by Storm Sandy. Then venue was kind enough to reschedule the show to January 14 at 8:30 PM. They will be giving the first live performance of my duo “For Milton:” written in memory of Milton Babbitt.

Event Details
Classical at the Cornelia
Righteous Girls- Gina Izzo, flute, and Erika Dohi, piano,
plus artist Zlata Kolomoyskaya and pianist Tristan McKay
Music by John Cage, Paul Brantley, Judd Greenstein & Randy Woolf
as well as new pieces by Christian Carey, Tristan McKay & Michael Patterson

Monday January 14 at 8:30 PM
Cornelia Street Café
29 Cornelia Street
New York, NY 10014
Phone: 212.989.9319
$10.00 cover plus $10.00 minimum

This Weekend: Emperor from Atlantis at Bohemian National Hall

Viktor Ullmann’s Der Kaiser von Atlantis was composed in 1943 while he was a prisoner in the Theresienstadt concentration camp. It was produced in the camp in 1944; Ullmann and his librettist, fellow prisoner Peter Kien, were murdered later that year in Auschwitz.

This weekend, Opera Moderne is reviving Emperor From Atlantis. This stirring work serves as a reminder that the Holocaust not only destroyed countless lives, but deprived the world of many fine creative works that could have been created by the artists among those murdered.

Event Details

Friday November 16th at 8pm

Saturday, November 17th at 8pm

Sunday November 18th at 4pm

Bohemian National Hall,

321 E. 73rd St, New York, NY

Tickets: $45 general admission; $65 premium reserved seating

Available for purchase at operamoderne.com

Friday and Saturday: C4 Ensemble

C4. Photo: Keith Goldstein.

For those of us here in New York and New Jersey, the past few weeks have been challenging. In the wake of Storm Sandy, we trust that better days are yet to come, but the present’s outlook is a bit dodgy. Some forward thinking optimism, particularly of the musical variety, is keenly welcome.

This weekend, C4 Ensemble, a collective of composers, conductors, and singers committed to new music (most wearing multiple hats in terms of their respective roles in the group), presents Music for People Who Like the Future.

Spotlighting the North American premiere of Andrew Hamilton’s Music for People Who Love the Future (hmm… I wonder if this title gave them the idea for the name of the show …), the program also features music by Chen Yi, Michael McGlynn, Sven-David Sandström, Phillipe Hersant, and Ted Hearne along with C4’s own Jonathan David, Mario Gullo, David Harris, and Karen Siegel.

Event Details 
Friday, November 16, 2012
The Church of St. Luke in the Fields
487 Hudson Street, NYC 10014
8 P.M.
$15 advance / $25 day of event/ 10 $4 “Rush” admissions 30 minutes advance at the door
Closest Subway:  1 to Christopher Street/Sheridan Square

Saturday, November 17, 2012
Mary Flagler Cary Hall at The DiMenna Center
450 W. 37th Street, NYC 10018
8 P.M.
$15 advance / $25 day of event / 10 $4 “Rush” admissions 30 minutes advance at the door
Closest Subways:  A/C/E to 34th Street/Penn Station
Reception to follow

Robert Paterson: Marimba Plus Six Mallets

Robert Paterson may not be the first or only person to use six mallets on the marimba; but he’s fast becoming a proselytizing percussionist for the technique. He has developed it based on the Burton grip with two additional mallets and is composing works to help expand the repertoire for sextuple sticking.

 

Christian Carey: Hi Rob. Thanks for talking about your unusual approach to playing the marimba. Lots of marimba repertoire is playable with a mallet or two in each hand. When did you first try adding two additional mallets to your technical routine? What did you feel this approach allows you to do at the instrument?

 

Robert Paterson: I first began exploring using six mallets when I was an undergrad student at the Eastman School of Music. It actually started out as an accident: there happened to be six mallets lying on top of my marimba, so I quickly grabbed all of them and began fooling around with a waltz-type figure to try and impress a girlfriend. I just happened to pick up the mallets in a way that worked, and I was immediately hooked.

 

Six-mallet technique allows for expanded harmonic possibilities, so for example, I can play triads in each hand. I can also quickly alternate mallets, so if you number them left to right, 1, 2/3, 4, 5/6, or whatever combination works. I can also play one-handed rolls quite easily, and play ripple roll chords that sound much more robust. You can also hold different mallets from left to right, so for example, a large rubber mallet as mallet 1, then five hard yarn mallets, so that the lowest note sounds very full and distinctive. There are seemingly limitless possibilities. Basically, anything that can be done with four mallets can be done with six, and with six I can do so much more.

 

If there’s one single goal I have with this new album, it’s to prove that six mallet technique is not a gimmick: I am definitely not just playing block chords on the naturals (i.e., the lower bank of notes), and I can really move the mallets around quite freely. The one thing I can’t do super fast if use mallets like piano fingers. I can do that to a certain degree, and at a moderate tempo, but it’s usually easier to alternate notes in melodic runs left hand to right hand.

 

CC: How has being a percussionist and marimba specialist impacted your work as a composer?

 

RP: There are certain technical aspects of composing I definitely obsess over, probably more than if I had grown up playing the violin or any other instrument. I am fascinated with resonance, and how notes ring. I also like bell sounds, and often ask non-percussionists to play cup gongs (temple bowls or Tibetan bowls), finger cymbals and other hand-held percussion instruments. A recent piece I wrote entitled A New Earth for orchestra, chorus and narrator requires certain players to play custom-tuned wind chimes, the kind you might have on your back porch. I am not sure if this stems from a sort of secret desire to bring other performers to the dark side of percussion land (although most of the time they really enjoy it), or that I just can’t disregard my roots, or something else entirely. Perhaps the main reason is that I really wish orchestras and other ensembles had larger percussion sections, so maybe this is my way of compensating, a sort of back door approach.

 

CC: Just in terms of your composing career, you’re a busy guy, with residencies, commissions, and involvement in running an ensemble (the American Modern Ensemble). How do you keep in shape as a performer?

 

RP: That’s a great question, and one I constantly struggle with. As I started receiving more commissions, residencies, and so on, and also started to conduct more, I eventually had to cut way back on performing, and only do what I really wanted to do, which at this point, happens to be marimba playing (often with six mallets) and occasionally new music by other composers. When I was younger, I definitely played my share of Messiah timpani parts and road shows for a variety of orchestras and chamber ensembles, and even rock gigs, but I eventually decided to leave all that behind so I could focus more on what I really love to do.

 

For me, the key to keeping in shape is to play a little every day (or a lot, obviously, if I am preparing for a concert). Admittedly, I think this is easier for percussionists than brass or wind players, or even string players. I can get back in shape pretty quickly, but that’s also because I have a pretty solid technical foundation and practiced a ton when I was younger, so it’s not too difficult.

 

CC: Wednesday night is the release show for not one, but two CDs, one showcasing your six-mallet marimba playing technique, another by Makoto Nakura that includes a new four mallet work you wrote. How did this confluence of releases come about? Also, you’ve been writing works including marimba for a while. Why did it now seem to be an opportune time to showcase these pieces on a single disc?

 

RP: The double release idea just sort of happened. I have been planning on releasing this Six Mallet Marimba album for years, but never had enough music, without including pieces that have nothing to do with marimba or six mallets. Many of my six mallet pieces are on the short side, so you need a bunch of them to make a full album. I finally had an album’s worth of pieces, so this seemed like the right time.

 

As for Makoto’s album, recently, my indie record company AMR (American Modern Recordings) signed a deal with him to re-release his older albums and also release Wood and Forest, his new album. Makoto commissioned me to write a new four-mallet piece, and since this was happening all around the same time, we decided to combine the events. We are cross advertising to each other’s followers and audiences, which is great. It’s not every day that you hear two marimbas together, particularly in the Rubin Museum of Art, so we thought audiences might enjoy that.

 

CC: What will attendees get to hear on the show?

 

RP: I am performing a marimba solo entitled Komodo (inspired by Komodo dragons), Braids for violin and marimba, with my wife Victoria (written for her, and inspired by watching her braid her hair and musical forms based on different braiding styles), Duo for Flute and Marimba, a three movement work that I’ll play with flutist Sato Mougalian  (the NY premiere), the world premiere performance of Stillness for oboe and marimba with oboist Keve Wilson, and finally the world premiere of a new marimba duo entitled Mandala, that was commissioned by Makoto. It is inspired by the theme of “happiness” and a Hevajra Mandala image in the Rubin Museum’s art collection.

 

Makoto will be performing four works: Mandala (with me), Forest Shadows for solo marimba, the four mallet piece I wrote for him, and two works by other composers. The first is Arbor Una Nobilis for marimba and violin by Jacob Bancks, which he will play with violinist Jesse Mills, and the second is Winik/Te’ for solo marimba by Carlos Sanches-Gutierrez. All in all, it will be a an exciting fascinating program, and I am really looking forward to hearing Makoto play live, and also to play this duo with him! It will be a complete thrill.

 

CC: AME seems to be going really well: getting lots of attention both for their live performance and recordings. What’s coming up next for the ensemble?

 

RP: Our next concert after this one is entitled The End Of The World, and it’s a collaborative event with Talujon, a NYC based percussion ensemble. AME will be performing works by a variety of composers, including George Crumb and George Rochberg, and Talujon will be performing works by Daniel Iglesia, Hannah Lash, and Daniel Wohl. Finally, next March, we will be presenting a concert tentatively titled Concertos & More, featuring works by Steve Mackey, Sean McClowry, a piece by me entitled Looney Tunes and a piece by Eric Nathan, the winner of our 2011-12 composition competition. We are also excited that we just became the official new music ensemble-in-residence at the CUNY Graduate Center in Manhattan, so we will be working with the composers at that institution as well.

 

We also have a few other recordings in the works, including a second two piano album (appropriately titled Powerhouse Pianists II) with Stephen Gosling and Blair McMillen, featuring piano duos by various excellent composers, a chamber vocal album of some of my music, and we will be on an album that will be released on Bridge Records with works by Steve Mackey. We have many other albums planned, but since we put a lot of love and care into each album, we try to only release them when they are good and ready and everyone is confident that they represent AME and AMR (American Modern Recordings) well. AMR thinks of itself as an indie boutique classical record company that releases the highest possible quality albums of contemporary music, so if we’re getting any attention, we’d like to think it’s because we have put so much love and care into what we do.

Event Details
American Modern Ensemble
Wednesday November 14, 2012 @ 7:00 PM
$15.00 in advance / $30.00 day of
Member Price: $13.50
The Rubin Museum of Art is located in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City
on 17th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues.
(Rubin Museumwebsite here)

Thursday, November 8: Duos at Symphony Space

On Thursday at Symphony Space, string duo Laurie Smukler (violin) and Joel Krosnick (cello) present a concert that includes both classical and contemporary duets. The program features one of the first musical tributes to Elliott Carter since his passing on Monday: the late work Tres Duetti. Krosnick, a former member of the Juilliard Quartet, collaborated closely with Carter, premiering and performing a number of his works. Another American composer with whom he worked closely was the self-styled “Radical Traditionalist” Ralph Shapey. Thursday’s concert has Duo Variations, a work by Shapey composed for Krosnick, slated for performance as well. Below, the cellist shares some words about knowing and working with Carter.

“For those of us who grew up as American musicians in the 1950′s playing the music of our time, and who have continued to do so until now,  Elliott Carter has been a seminal philosophical presence in our entire lives as musicians.  From the appearance of the astonishingly massive Quartet No. 1 in 1951, through the four other quartets culminating with the 5th Quartet in the late 1990′s, Mr. Carter has been, for just a small example, an integral part of the life of anyone who loved and played string quartets.  The Juilliard Quartet premiered the 2nd and 3rd Quartets of Mr. Carter, and of course played them all.  (We will play the 5th String Quartet at a Juilliard School concert on December 19, which was to be a celebration of Mr. Carter’s 104th birthday.)

“My first memorable experience with the music of Elliott Carter was of course the Cello Sonata from 1948, perhaps the most important cello sonata of my lifetime as a musician.  I had the great good fortune to be allowed by Mr. Carter to make an early recording of that great work in the mid 1960′s with the pianist Paul Jacobs for Nonesuch Records (followed in the 1990′s by a second recording of the work with my pianist partner, Gilbert Kalish, for Arabesque Records).  And since that time, I have had the privilege of being a part of innumerable performances over many years of the Cello Sonata, all five of the String Quartets, the Harpsichord Sonata, the Triple Duo, the Oboe Quartet, the Figment No. 1 for Solo Cello, the Tre Duetti for Violin and Cello,  the Piano Quintet, and the Clarinet Quintet (written for and premiered by Charles Neidich and the Juilliard String Quartet).

 

“As I have said, Elliott Carter has been a major presence in my life as a musician, almost from the start.  Even considering his advanced age of 103, it is suddenly astonishing that he will no longer be with us writing his great music.”

Event Details
In the Salon at Symphony Space
Laurie Smukler and Joel Krosnick
Thursday, November 8 at 7:30 PM
Nimoy Thalia Theater
Tickets here

Tomorrow at Rutgers: Quintet (Concert announcement)

Nicholas Music Center

The last time my Quintet (1998) was performed was in 2005 by the New Jersey Arts Collective. Tomorrow, Rutgers University Professor Paul Hoffman, director of RU’s Helix! New Music Ensemble, will revive the piece.

This past Wednesday, I had a chance to hear the group rehearse: they are a crack unit of burgeoning new music talent. Most of the program celebrates the work of John Cage. Excited to hear them on Sunday afternoon. If you are in the area and have sufficiently battened the hatches for “Frankenstorm,” consider joining us at 2PM at Nicholas Music Center in New Brunswick, NJ.

(Here is an article, written by Carlton Wilkinson,  previewing the concert for the Asbury Park Press).

Program Note: 
“Quintet for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and vibraphone was composed in 1997 and 1998. It was the first piece I completed while studying with Charles Wuorinen in the doctoral program at Rutgers University. It was also the first of several works I composed that was inspired by visual artworks from the Abstract Expressionist movement. Quintet was premiered by New York New Music Ensemble at June in Buffalo in 1998 and received subsequent performances by Ionisation and Helix!”
-Christian Carey

Friday: Chiasmus Ensemble in Manchester

On Friday, October 26th, the Chiasmus Ensemble will be giving the UK premiere of my trio Innesscapes. To my knowledge, it is the first of any of my pieces to be heard in England. I’m very grateful to them for programming the piece.

Chiasmus Ensemble

The program also includes the premiere of Chiasmus director James Stephenson’s Piano Quintet, as well as music by Eve Harrison and Idin Samimi Mofakham.

Sounds of the Engine House - Event Details

International Anthony Burgess Foundation - Cambridge Street, MANCHESTER, M1 5BY

Date: October 26 Time: 7.30pm start

Price: £3 entry

 

Tonight at Tenri: Counterinduction

counter)induction

Tonight, one of New York’s finest contemporary ensembles, counter)induction, joins forces with Washington Square Contemporary Music Society to present “American Explorations,” a program featuring three generations of American composers, at the Tenri Cultural Institute. 

Carson Cooman

The program includes premieres by composers Louis Karchin and Brian Fennelly, as well as works by Carson Cooman, Jesse Jones, Kyle Bartlett, and Yehudi Wyner. Given the composers on offer, one should expect a stylistically diverse and challenging program. Given the performers involved, one should expect those challenges to be met handily.

Program Details

counter)induction

Taka Kigawa, piano
Miranda Cuckson, violin
Max Mandel, viola
Chris Gross, cello
Benjamin Fingland, clarinet

FennellyKythera Variations

KarchinTwo Lyrics for Solo Cello

CoomanMadaket Dreaming

JonesSnippet Variations

WynerRomances for Piano Quartet

BartlettSpell

$15 general admission/$10 seniors/$5 students

Tenri Cultural Institute, NYC

Brian Fennelly

43A W 13th St
New York, NY
(between 5th and 6th avenues)

Louis Karchin