Kitten on the …

Every time I go to the piano to practice, I soon sense a presence on the other side of the music desk. Daisy, our eleven month old kitten, peers over the top of the desk, waiting for me to begin playing.

As soon as the music starts, she begins attacking the dampers and strings, trying to “catch” the notes. The effect of these inside the piano exertions is noticeable. Indeed, it makes everything I play, even baroque preludes, sound far more ultramodern: Bach morphs into something akin to Henry Cowell’s “The Banshee!”

Marilyn Nonken talks about Feldman Festival

Pianist Marilyn Nonken is performing Triadic Memories on June 4 in Philadelphia as part of “American Sublime,” a festival devoted to the works of Morton Feldman. Marilyn was kind enough to tell us a bit about working on Feldman’s music, as well as some of her other upcoming projects.

-What were your early encounters with Feldman’s music like?

I can’t remember my first live Feldman experience as a listener. One of the first works I remember hearing was FOR SAMUEL BECKETT. My first experience playing Feldman was with Ensemble 21, when we performed VIOLIN VIOLA CELLO PIANO, which was just a transformative experience for me, as a chamber player. After that experience, I very much wanted to find a solo work of his to perform and possibly record.

Listening to Feldman is special because there is that great luxury of time. It can take, in TRIADIC MEMORIES for example, maybe a half-an-hour or forty-five minutes to get acclimated to the environment of the work, and to become familiar with the kinds of things that happen in that special environment. In each of his pieces, I think, there’s an extended period where the materials introduce themselves, so to say.It’s not dynamic in the sense of something happening right away, or a conflict being presented, or a big question being asked — and so I feel it’s best to not aggressively try and “figure out” what is happening.

- Which pieces by Feldman have you performed?

VIOLIN VIOLA CELLO PIANO, EXTENSIONS 1, THE VIOLA IN MY LIFE, INTERSECTION 2, PALAIS DE MARI, and TRIADIC MEMORIES –

- What do you think Feldman meant by titling a piece Triadic Memories?

Feldman’s piano music is all about decay, what he would refer to as a kind of receding landscape …. For me, that sense of resonance and the dying of the sound is perhaps the most important part of the piece. His harmonies are gorgeous, very lush and evocative — but as beautiful as they are, more of the piece is spend listening to them fade.

- When did you record Triadic Memories for Mode? Has your performance of the work changed over time?

I believe this is 2004, recorded perhaps summer 2003. I’m sure my performance has changed — although not drastically. In terms of timing and rhythmic precision, I believe it’s very consistent with the recorded version. I’m still convinced by that “magic” (for me) tempo and the specificity of the rhythms, and the way I first conceived of articulating them. But I do feel that I’ve become more sensitive to the harmonic nuances of the work, as I’ve become more familiar with it over the years —  the way I voice things, and the way I anticipate the decay, I think, has become more personal.

- While they’re not often showy, Feldman’s pieces make significant demands of their own on performers. Can you tell us a bit about those, and how you prepare to perform Triadic Memories in concert?

I feel these works are very virtuosic, despite the fact that they’re not fast and full of passagework. There’s a moment-to-moment control that Feldman requires, in terms of dynamic and timbre and attack, which requires a tremendous amount of physical and mental preparation. To be that attuned to the smallest nuances, and physically in total control, for such a significant span w/o any real “recess” requires a special kind of concentration. For me, there is no substitute for playing the work — in real time, w/o interruption, — daily for at least a week or two before the concert. There is always detail-work to be done (specificity of rhythms, defining colors, making certain that the surface of the work is somehow “flawless” and w/o rupture — but doing everything sequentially, in tempo, is always a test.

- After Triadic Memories, what are some of your upcoming projects?

I’m very excited to be working again with the fabulous pianist Sarah Rothenberg on a four-hand Kurtag program, combining (as the composer himself has done) Kurtag’s JATEKOK with his Bach transcriptions, presented as a concert program on an upright piano. Sarah and I had a fantastic time working on Messiaen’s VISIONS DE L’AMEN, touring and recording it, and this is a very different and intimate kind of project —  I’m also preparing for a recording of American spectralist composer Joshua Fineberg’s complete solo piano music, which will appear on CD with Hugues Dufourt’s recent ERLKONIG — a follow-up to my complete Murail disc. It will feature a new work written for me by Joshua, amd I am very much looking forward to touring with that, as a complete program in itself. And just after this Festival, I’m recording Elizabeth Hoffman’s “organum let open,” a beautiful work she wrote for me last year, based on texts of theatre artist George Hunka. It’s wonderful to be doing such recent music, and inspiring to be working with such talented composers.

Hauschka: “The Key” (Video)

Hauschka
Salon des Amateurs
Fat Cat CD

Hauschka’s latest recording, Salon des Amateurs, continues his path of prepared piano explorations. But it includes additional layers of instruments, with a host of collaborators that includes John Convertino and Joey Burns (Calexico), and occasional Sequenza 21 blogger (and world famous violinist) Hilary Hahn.

Likewise, much has been made of its allusions to electronica and even dance music (the album is named after a club in Hauschka’s hometown Düsseldorf). But rather than seeming out of place, this becomes yet another facet of the musical landscape of Salon des Amateurs; playfully integrated with imaginative wit.


Hauschka (Live video)


Pianist Hauschka moves closer to the motoric environs of minimalism and even house music on his latest release, Salon des Amateurs (FatCat).




HAUSCHKA ON TOUR
April 17 – San Francisco, CA @ Great American Music Hall
April 19 – Portland, OR @ Holocene
April 20 – Seattle, WA @ Triple Door
April 21 – Vancouver, BC @ Media Club
April 23 – New York, NY @ Joe’s Pub
April 24 – Philadelphia, PA @ World Cafe
April 26 – Chicago, IL @ Schuba’s
April 28 – Toronto, ON @ Music Gallery
April 29 – Santa Cruz, CA @ Kuumbwa Jazz
May 1 – Los Angeles, CA @ Masonic Lodge at Hollywood Forever Cemetery

Ben & Vesper: “My Father’s Eyes” (Video)



Honors, Ben & Vesper’s latest recording (via Sounds Familyre) finds the group combining power pop hooks and imaginative lyrics into a whimsical yet musically focused outing.

Below is an animated video for “My Father’s Eyes,” one of the album’s standout tracks. We’ve also got an MP3 for your delectation: the sweetly sung piano ballad “Knee-Hi Wall.”

My Father’s Eyes from Ben Stamper/Cines&Wonders Films on Vimeo.

Knee-Hi Wall

Rzewski plays his magnum opus (Video)




Reading the news this AM was sobering and affecting. Scenes of brutality unfolding in Egypt’s struggle for democracy, and concurrent acts of bravery from protestors struggling for basic human rights, are replacing those of peaceful protest. It appears that the struggle for change in Egypt will be harder than many around the world had hoped. I’m reminded me of how fortunate I am to live in a country where I can speak freely, assemble peacefully, and have the right to vote. No matter how the crisis in Egypt ultimately is resolved, I earnestly wish that the same opportunities will be afforded to the Egyptian people.

In light of the recent events in the Middle East, my thoughts turned to politically engaged music. I couldn’t help but hear Frederic Rzewski’s imposing series of variations on The People Who are United Will Never Be Defeated, a Chilean song, as a piece that remains equally relevant today.

Here is an excerpt of the work, performed by the composer in 2007.