Jarrell’s Cassandra Receives US Premiere

Jarrell and Clementi. Photo: Andi Olsen

Jarrell and Clementi.
Photo: Andi Olsen

One of the oldest stories left to humanity, yet it still can withstand and even thrive in new adaptations…

On Thursday and Friday, Swiss composer Michael Jarrell opera Cassandra will be given its US Premiere at Bohemian National Hall in New York City (details below). Based on the 1984 novel by Christa Wolf, the monodrama deals with the fallout of the Trojan war for King Priam’s prescient daughter. Actress Anna Clementi is joined by an 18-member ensemble and bolstered by electronic music and the work of Czech video artist Dalibor Pys. 

For those subtitle weary among you, there’s good news: the work will be given in English (However, our teaser video below is in French!).

    Performance Details

Michael Jarrell’s Cassandra
Featuring Actress Anna Clementi and the Argento Chamber Ensemble; Michel Galante, conductor
February 6 & 7 at 7:00 PM,
Bohemian National Hall, 321 E. 73rd Street in New York City.
Free Event

Kremer plays Weinberg

Mieczyslaw Weinberg

Gidon Kremer; Kremerata Baltica

ECM New Series 2368/69 (2XCD)

The revival of music by Mieczyslaw Weinberg (1919-1996) is provided significant momentum by this double-disc set from ECM. Violinist Gidon Kremer and his Kremerata Baltica project prove to be ardent interpreters of Weinberg’s works. The release’s program includes chamber music and compositions for larger ensemble (including the centerpiece, his Tenth Symphony); it provides a fine overview of Weinberg’s aesthetic. He is often compared to Shostakovich, not unduly, as the solo sonata performed searingly here by Kremer attests, but Weinberg is a distinctive figure in his own right who deserves more frequent and prominent placement on concert programs.

You can hear Kremer and Co. performing this music tonight in New York and over the next week in other US cities (dates below).

Kremerata Baltica in Concert


January 30 – New York, NY at 92Y Kaufmann Concert Hall    

http://www.92y.org/Uptown/Event/Kremerata-Baltica.aspx

              

February 2 – San Francisco, CA at Davies Symphony Hall       

http://www.sfsymphony.org/Buy-Tickets/2013-2014/Gidon-Kremer-and-Kremerata-Baltica.aspx

 

February 4 – Houston, TX at Stude Concert Hall       

http://houstonfriendsofchambermusic.org/series/2013-14/Kremerata/

                             

February 6 – Ann Arbor, MI at Hill Auditorium                         

http://tickets.ums.org/single/EventDetail.aspx?p=1653

              

February 7 – Chicago, IL at Harris Theater   

http://www.harristheaterchicago.org/events/2013-2014-season/kremerata-baltica

                             

February 8 – St Paul, MN at Ordway Center for the Performing Arts  

http://schubert.org/concerts/international-artist-series/gidon-kremer-violin-with-kremerata-baltica/

Kigawa plays Ligeti at LPR

On Friday, pianist Taka Kigawa joins Ensemble LPR for a program of contemporary classical music, both watershed works and new offerings. The concert’s centerpiece is Ligeti’s Piano Concerto. The Ensemble also performs Varèse’s Octandre and Gallery Music by composer/conductor Brad Lubman (best known for his work with Ensemble Signal).

Kigawa also plays two solo pieces, Joule by Dai Fujikura and The Thinking Eye by area (Columbia U.) composer Zosha Di Castri. 

Check out a video of the Fujikura work below.

Taka Kigawa, piano; Ensemble LPR, Oliver Hagen, conductor

Friday, January 24th 8pm, at (le) Poisson Rouge.

Program

Edgard Varèse: Octandre
Brad Lubman: Gallery Music
Zosha Di Castri: The Thinking Eye
Dai Fujikura: Joule
György Ligeti: Piano Concerto

For more info and tickets, visit LPR’s website.

Levin – Minnemann – Rudess (CD Review)

LevinMinnemannRudess

S/T CD

Lazy Bones Recordings

 

Prog — especially NeoProg of the instrumental variety — gets a fair amount of heat from mainstream music critics. They throw around terms like  “noodly,” “artificial,” “overly showy,”  “bloated,” etc., and pretend that the state of middle-of-the-road rock or garage rock’s umpteenth incarnation is instead just fine, thanks very much. One hopes that they — and the listeners who read their reviews — won’t pass up this release because of a superficial prejudice or hangup about the genre in which it (loosely) resides.

 

Between them, bassist Tony Levin, guitarist/percussionist Marco Minnemann, and keyboardist Jordan Rudess have amassed an astounding list of recording credits. They each have the reputation of being stunning virtuosos who are also amiable collaborators — a simpatico mixture of qualities not often found. Putting them together is a combustible yet protean musical mixture.

 

LMR’s self-titled debut recording contains fourteen pieces of rhythmically complex and abundantly energetic music. While layering of tracks are necessary in this context (for starters, their guitarist is also their drummer!), overdubbing doesn’t equate to sterility here: LMR still retains the vitality and heavy rhythmic groove of an estimable power trio. From the hard rock riffs and polyrhythmic corruscations of “Marcopolis,” to the thunderous drumming and rampant arpeggiations of “Mew,” and the fearsome low end of “Enter the Core” and “Frumious Banderfunk” (gotta’ love that title!), each cut rocks harder than the last. There are also some affecting textural designs that demonstrate Rudess’ keyboard prowess and his talent for melding different patches on “The Blizzard,” “Orbiter,” and elsewhere.

 

In this era of shrinking attention spans and itchy fingers aching to punch the shuffle button, a likely response from some of the aforementioned hypothetical listeners might well be, “Fourteen tracks! C’mon how many do you really need?” In my opinion, there’s not an ounce of fat here — each piece offers a different facet of the trio’s music-making. Recommended.

 

- Christian Carey

RIP John Tavener

We were saddened to learn of the passing of John Tavener, English composer of concert music based on the Christian Orthodox liturgy.

John Tavener composed “Jesus Prayer” specifically for Björk Guðmundsdóttir’s voice.

She posted the following message on her website: “John tavener : i feel honoured that i got to know him … and that he wrote one song for my voice … incredibly pure composer

condolences to his family

warmth,
björk.”

Program note – Ionisation

Ionisation

 

Scientists describe ionisation as the process in which, by gaining or losing electrons, atoms or molecules come to possess a positive or negative charge. For his percussion ensemble work Ionisation (1931), Edgard Varèse uses this scientific principle both as the work’s title and as an extra-musical idea that impacts its form. For much of the piece, the composer explores instruments of indefinite pitch (drums, cymbals) or rapidly shifting pitch (sirens and the lion’s roar): the noise spectrum. It is only at the very end of Ionisation that, structured as dissonant chordal verticals, pitches from the 12-tone chromatic scale are significantly used. The listener can judge whether the addition of notes to noise is designed to give a positive or negative jolt.

 

The principal building blocks of the piece are small rhythmic cells that permute and develop, at one point or another appearing in most of the instruments’ parts. There is also a significant exploration of antiphonal sounds: the thirteen musicians specified in the score each have a motley assortment of instruments to play, thus treating listeners to a widely spaced and diverse palette of timbres.

 

No musical composition is created in a vacuum. When writing Ionisation, Varèse was influenced by a number of preceding pieces and artistic movements: Stravinsky’s Sacre du Printemps (1913), Dada, George Antheil’s Ballet Mechanique (1924), Amadeo Roldán’s Ritmica No. 5 (1930), and, of course, by the noise concoctions and sound art manifestos of Italian futurists such as Filippo Tomasso Marinetti and Luigi Russolo. But this debt has been more than abundantly repaid. Indeed, Ionisation has served as a musical touchstone for numerous subsequent pieces by composers such as John Cage, Lou Harrison, Nicholas Slonimsky, James Tenney, Charles Wuorinen, and Frank Zappa. In many ways, Ionisation was the percussion ensemble’s “Declaration of Independence.” Certainly, New Jersey Percussion Ensemble wouldn’t be the same without it.

New Jersey Percussion Ensemble plays Ionisation, as well as pieces by Saperstein, Kresky, Carey, and others, on November 25 at 7 PM at William Paterson University. 

 

RIP Lou Reed (1942-2013)

lou_reed_286

“One chord is fine. Two chords are pushing it. Three chords and you’re into jazz.”

- Lou Reed

Much of my music passes the above “into jazz” marker. That said, Lou Reed taught me a great deal about productivity, creativity, and the maxim that “sometimes, less is more.”

Sad tonight for Laurie Anderson, and for us, who are deprived of more “more with less.”

Saturday: Ekmeles visits Rutgers

ekmelesinconcert

When I was a graduate student at Rutgers (a little over a decade ago), the composition students were fortunate to have the Helix! Ensemble, a contemporary music group in residence at Rutgers, to perform our compositions alongside other new works. I have many fond memories of working with Helix!. Apart from that, other ensembles at the school occasionally (more occasionally than we would have preferred) worked with the graduate students, and we had a department forum with guest speakers.

Of late, RU’s composition program has a lot more going on. New chair Robert Aldridge seems to have brought with him a great deal of energy and enthusiasm, which has trickled down and improved things for composers. Helix! is still there and active as ever, directed by pianist and conductor Paul Hoffmann (the group’s Fall concert is on Sunday at 2 PM). Several other campus ensembles are regularly working with student composers. The students are also active in presenting their own and each others’s music in recital. Distinguished composers Charles Fussell and Gerald Chenoweth remain on the faculty and Christopher Doll is a more recent addition.  Aldridge is teaching composers as well as chairing the department; Tarik O’Regan is also teaching at Rutgers this year.

Another welcome addition: inviting guest artists to campus to work with composers. On Saturday, New York-based vocal ensemble Ekmeles performs a program of new pieces by RU composers. Ekmeles is well known for their tremendous facility with extended techniques: I’ve written in the past about their accomplishments singing Gesualdo (in Vicentino’s tuning), Carter, and contemporary microtonal music. I’m looking forward to hearing what the students will learn from Ekmeles – and try out in Saturday evening’s concert (7:30 PM at Schare Hall – Mason Gross School of the Arts).

10/19: Dar Williams at Symphony Space

dar williams picture

On Saturday, October 19th at 8 PM, Singer-songwriter Dar Williams will perform at New York City’s Symphony SpaceThe concert is part of a tour in support of Williams’s latest studio album, In The Time Of Gods (2012, Razor & Tie). The album presents ten tales from Greek mythology which are repurposed by Williams to address contemporary issues. Like much of her previous work, the recording sits astride folk and pop idioms, creating an  ear-pleasing yet thoughtful and substantial impression.

 

Those who enjoyed the second disc of Many Great Companions, the songwriter’s 2010 greatest hits compilation, with its stripped down renditions of songs from her catalogue, are likely to be pleased with the acoustic setting in which the Symphony Space performance takes place. Instead of a full band, Williams will perform as part of a duo, singing and playing guitar, accompanied by pianist Bryn Roberts. 

Opening act The Rebecca West operates in a similar “chamber folk” idiom. Alex Dezen (the Damnwells), Cameron Dezen, and Matt Hamon. Their first EP, Lost and Found, displays a capacity for generously melodic hooks and winsome three-part harmony vocals.