Hilda Paredes Mode 2016

Hilda Paredes

Señales

Mode Records CD 292

Irvine Arditti, violin; Ensemble Signal, conducted by Brad Lubman; ensemble recherché; Alberto Rosado, piano; Adrián Sandi, bass clarinet

Born in Tehuacan, Puebla, Mexico in 1957 and a resident of London since 1979, Hilda Paredes is one of the most prominent Mexican composers of contemporary concert music. Her latest recording on Mode presents five chamber pieces in riveting performances.

The title work, written in memory of British composer Jonathan Harvey, is a collaboration between violinist Irvine Arditti and Ensemble Signal, conducted by Brad Lubman. Like many of Paredes’s works that include stringed instruments, Señales features a great number of glissandos, both fingered and sliding. Wind instruments supply gusting, whistling glissandos too. This technique is complemented by long sustained notes and fast angular passagework. The piece also displays deft use of percussion, including vibraphone, marimba, cimbalom, and all manner of unpitched percussion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTLQDPwY9Qs

Páramo de voces, for piano and tape, is performed here by Alberto Rosado. Acerbically nimble sections of melodic writing are succeeded by emphatic fifths and octaves. There is some playing of the interior of the piano and the tape part adds resonance and sustained flute-like timbres to the proceedings. The Pierrot plus percussion piece Homenaje a Remedios Varo, premiered by the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble but played here by ensemble recherché, is cast in five short movements, almost like character pieces. The opening has a Feldman-esque sensibility about it: pianissimo and slow, with ambling placement of intervals. Elsewhere, the piece is populated by whirling motion and trills, harmonics, and Paredes’s ever present glissandos. There is a gradual buildup to a piano cadenza, followed by an exuberant finale filled with fast passages for each ensemble member in turn.

Adrián Sandi performs the solo bass clarinet piece Intermezzo malinconcio with precision and energy. Percussive single note punctuations, repeated passages, pitch bends, and angular lines demonstrate this as a composition that distills the essence of many of Paredes’s gestural interests. Some nice microtonal inflections too. ensemble recherché returns for the disc’s final work, Recuerdos del Porvenir. The group asked Paredes to use a particular plainchant, “Gloria Tibi Trinitas,” upon which to base the composition. The chant moves from the surface in melodic presentations to eventually be subsumed into the piece’s background. Recuerdos del Porvenir is remarkable in its composer’s imaginative use of this economic motive, deriving a great deal from the chant yet retaining the highly gestural and chromatic environment of her style. This recording is an engaging portrait of a fascinating composer.

 

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Zodiac Trio

Dreamtime

Zodiac Trio

Kliment Krylovskiy, clarinet
Vanessa Mollard, violin
Riko Higuma, piano

Blue Griffin Records CD/download

Formed at Manhattan School of Music in 2006, the Zodiac Trio have been ambitious in their commissioning projects. Joined by guest cellist Ariel Barnes, on their second album Dreamtime they tackle a program consisting entirely of 21st century music.

The CD features two substantial commissioned works: Lamentations, by Richard Danielpour, and Andrew List’s Klezmer Fantazye.  As one might well expect, both use the scalar patterns and gestural language of Klezmer, Danielpour in plaintive fashion and List with greater exuberance. On Aboriginal Dreamtime, List uses that culture’s creation myth as a starting pointing for an evocative piece. The group switches gears on John Mackey’s Breakdown Tango. Joined by Barnes, the Zodiac demonstrates ample virtuosity, playing with rhythmic verve and tight knit ensemble coordination.

Dreamtime is capped off with Across the Universe, a twelve-piece collection featuring one-minute pieces all inspired by signs of the Zodiac. It is a great way to put a distinctive stamp on the commissioning process (each piece responds to its particular sign thoughtfully and imaginatively) and to provide a “taster platter” of several composers’ styles. Standouts include Stanley Hoffmann’s lilting dance for Capricorne, James Romig’s delicately mysterious Virgo, John McDonald’s piquant Scorpio, and Francine Trester’s bumptious Aries. 

One hopes that Zodiac will continue commissioning. Dreamtime demonstrates that they excel at bringing new compositions to life.

 

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currents.jpeg

Currents

Michael Mizrahi, piano

Works by Sarah Kirkland Snider, Troy Herion, Mark Dancigers, Asha Srinivasan, Missy Mazzoli, and Patrick Burke

New Amsterdam CD/DL

Pianist Michael Mizrahi’s sophomore album Currents is out this week via New Amsterdam Records. Below is the considerably charming video introduction to the release, featuring  excerpts from Troy Herion’s Harpsichords. 

 

The title track, by Sarah Kirkland Snider, is a real standout. It adroitly covers a wide swath of both emotional and technical terrain. Thus, it is an ideal solo vehicle for Mizrahi, a pianist who clearly treasures this collection of works, each one filled with abundant variety. And the way that he plays them, he’s likely to make many listeners treasure them too.

[bandcamp width=100% height=120 album=2565163406 size=large bgcol=ffffff linkcol=0687f5 tracklist=false artwork=small track=1568922076]

 

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401_LP-cover_400

Matmos

Ultimate Care II

Thrill Jockey Records

Matmos (the duo of M. C. (Martin) Schmidt and Drew Daniel) uses an unusual sonic palette for their latest Thrill Jockey recording, Ultimate Care II. The sounds of the recording are made with the Whirlpool Ultimate Care II model washing machine in the basement of their home in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition to a plethora of washing sounds – the spin cycle is quite striking – Matmos enlisted the aid of various artists –Dan Deacon, Max Eilbacher (Horse Lords), Sam Haberman (Horse Lords), Jason Willett (Half Japanese), and Duncan Moore (Needle Gun) – to treat the machine both as a percussion instrument and as a source for computer music manipulations. The clincher: many of them do their laundry at Matmos’s apartment!

Jaded listeners might presume that the results would be gimmicky; they are anything but. To the contrary, one is startled by the array of sounds elicited from the Whirlpool and the thoughtful organization thereof. Who knew that riveting electronica could be made in a laundry room?

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vijay iyer and wadada leo smith

A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke

Vijay Iyer, piano, Fender Rhodes, electronics

Wadada Leo Smith, trumpet

ECM New Series CD 2486

 

A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke is a duo outing featuring keyboardist (and recently hired Harvard Professor) Vijay Iyer and trumpeter elder statesman Wadada Leo Smith. The most striking aspect of the duo’s approach is their willingness to cede each other space in the proceedings. Thus instead of the rapid call and response we frequently hear from jazz duos, here there are often successive solos which mine connected musical territories.

The central part of the album is an extended suite titled A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke. Dedicated to Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi (1937-1990), it finds the duo exploring a variety of textures. In addition to piano, Iyer breaks out electronics and a Fender Rhodes, leavening the proceedings with a judicious use of each. Smith frequently explores the stratospheric range of his instrument, punctuating his solos with trills, staccato outbursts, and overblowing. When the two come together in closer colloquy, the intervening soloing morphs into an impressively rich stack of piquant harmonies and imitative gestures.

The CD closes with a truly beautiful composition by Smith, “Marian Anderson,” named after the celebrated African-American contralto. Along with the album opener, Iyer’s “Passage,” it brings out a different demeanor from the musicians: lyrical, less angular, and more directly collaborative. While one certainly appreciates the approach on the central suite, offsetting it with these two tunes is an elegant touch.

 

 

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pi65_500

The Inner Spectrum of Variables

Pi Recordings #pi65

featuring:

Composer Tyshawn Sorey’s latest recording is of a massive two-hour long suite for Double Trio. The Inner Spectrum of Variables finds Sorey conducting a group of longtime collaborators. Sorey has said that his approach to conducting serves as homage to Butch Morris, whose ensemble leadership was called “conduction.” He also contributes the percussion parts to the recording, ranging from textural excursions to thunderous swing.

Given its leader’s voluminous list of stylistic interests, it is no surprise that The Inner Spectrum of Variables is persistently eclectic. With four string players and a pianist in the mix, there is a great deal of opportunity for Sorey to explore his more classically-based approach to composition and improvisation. But the group can turn on a dime and play folk music seemingly from the world over, or get into a fluent post-bop groove. Despite the work’s considerable duration, the amount of quick changes of demeanor can be head spinning. That said, the return of discrete sections helps to provide an overarching structure that undergirds the proceedings. And unlike previous Sorey compositions, long swaths of lyricism abound here: an appealing addition to his already formidable compositional kitbag. Recommended.

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residues

Luke Martin

residues

FWD: /rcrds/

 

 

 

Jonathan Tang
Yvette Holzwarth
Joy Yi
Thea Mesirow

 

 

 

From the FWD: /rcrds/ label comes a new album by Luke Martin titled residues. This is a five-track CD of experimental music created by intensive collaboration with a string quartet. Each track in the album is based on original poetry, as Luke Martin explains in the liner notes: “Each score was created from the images of five everyday objects, which were slightly altered via parameters of brightness, contrast, and exposure to make ‘residues’ of the original images, and then coupled with ‘residual’ poems I wrote for each piece.”

The first track, remembrances, begins with a soft scraping sound with just a hint of musical tones in the higher strings. There is a quiet but purposefully active feel to this. Some low buzzing in the cello is just audible, sounding like distant bees and adding an organic component to the atmosphere. The scraping continues, louder now, with some occasional squeaks and taps. There is a nice balance between the soft strings and the industrial sounds – the latter does not overwhelm. As the piece progresses it maintains a continuously active texture that evokes a sense of movement that is never dull or boring.

histories is track 2 and here the string sounds here are much stronger, especially in the lower registers which carry a sense of foreboding. Individual passages are played simultaneously – unconnected, but they play off one another as if in conversation. Now a brief silence is followed by strong declarative phrases below, and answered by a flurry of light skittering notes in the violins. More silence and another strong statement in the viola. Light, airy sounds reappear in the violin – almost flute-like in tone and making for a good contrast – like hearing differing opinions during a discussion. This is followed by three strong voices grinding together with higher screeching noises rising above the low texture and evoking a sense of tension and anxiety. The piece continues along in this way – episodic, with low and loud passages countered by lighter and softer phrases in the violins all followed by a few seconds of silence. The various instruments seem to be reacting to each other, echoing emotions ranging from anger to fear.

Track 3 is structures and this begins with soft whispers “Can you say something?” A strong tone from the viola and a quieter line in the violin obscure the voices. The string tones are rough and sustained and add to the disconcerting atmosphere. The phrases can be heard when the strings subside, but there is little perceived continuity to the speech. Long silences intervene, adding to the mystery. The piece proceeds in this fashion with soft, indistinct voices countered by loud, angst-filled string tones. The spoken phrases are repeated, but not connected together and the strings can sound, at times, like sirens or train horns. The contrast between the secretive voices and aggressive string tones is emphasized by the soft whispering and the feeling is secretive and conspiratorial.

Track 4, fragilities, and for the first two minutes this contains only ambient sounds – some soft scraping, a few thumps – as if some sort of quiet preparation is in progress. Whispered poetry and the creaking sound of a string being tightened is heard, and this adds a bit of anxiety to the atmosphere. All is mechanical and wooden – no musical tones are played – and the whispers create a sort of confidential atmosphere, as if there is some undercover plot afoot. fragilities continues in this subdued fashion, and we are all in on the secret.

The final track of the album is unfoldings and this begins with a tutti chord of instruments and voices that fill the ears – like a group of air horns all going off at once. Strong, sustained tones build in intensity, sounding as if in warning. There is a distinct sense of foreboding here, even while the harmonies are refreshing and intriguing. At the midpoint these sounds begin a slow decrescendo, finally fading to a silence. The rest of unfoldings is now quiet or barely heard – no musical tones – only soft ambient sounds of breathing, light tapping, etc. This makes for a strong contrast to the alarms of the opening section and continues on for the balance of the piece, fading to silence at the finish.

residues lies at the intersection of music and sound, always pushing the listener to connect to the dots. The mix of whispered poetry, ambient sounds and musical fragments form a matrix of possibilities for the imagination that provide new pathways for expression and emotion.

Personnel:
Luke Martin
Jonathan Tang, violin
Yvette Holzwarth, violin
Joy Yi, viola
Thea Mesirow, cello

residues is available directly from FWD: /rcrds/

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breadwoman

Anna Homler

Steve Moshier

 

Breadwoman & Other Tales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breadwoman & Other Tales is a recently-released CD on the RVNG Intl label featuring the music of Anna Homler and Steve Moshier. Breadwoman is the persona adopted by vocalist Homler and the liner notes describe her as follows: “Breadwoman is a guide, a storyteller and an observer of human events. She communicates with gestures and songs in a language that is both mysterious and familiar. Breadwoman is so very old that she stands outside of time. Her territory is that of the interior, where there are no distinctions and all things are whole.”

Although the CD was released in February 2016, the music dates from the early 1980s Los Angeles new music scene. Anna Homler was deeply involved in performance art and recorded the vocalizing that ultimately became Breadwoman as she drove around town in her car. At the same time Steve Moshier was a percussionist with the Cartesian Reunion Memorial Orchestra, often performing at the same experimental dance and theater venues where Homler appeared. Their collaboration was natural, with Anna supplying her cassette recordings to Moshier, who created the electronic accompaniment. The process was iterative – the vocals evolving as each version of the electronics was realized. This was a complex and time-consuming undertaking given the technology of the time – Moshier was working with a Kurzweil K2000 synthesizer, a Prophet analog synth, a Sequential Circuits sequencer along with 2-track and 4-track tapes.

The resulting tracks on Breadwoman & Other Tales are remarkable for their convincing insight and invocation of primal music. None of the vocal lines are heard in English but are rather spoken in some unknown ancient tongue, perhaps Eastern European in origin. The melody lines are clear and precisely sung by Ms. Homler, and the strange accents and words persuasively evoke life in a small village thousands of years ago. Moshier’s electronic accompaniment is completely contemporary and, by comparison, futuristic. This makes for an engaging balance – the timeworn words and melodies offset by analog electronic tones, adding to the mysterious and mystical feel in all these pieces.

Even without comprehensible words or context, the songs are recognizable for the human emotions they express. Anna Homler studied anthropology as an undergraduate at UCLA and the daily ebb and flow of primal society fills each of these pieces. Gu She’ Na’ Di, track 3, could be a folk melody about new love – full of optimism and hope – with a clarinet line that compliments the singing perfectly. Giyah on track 4, however, is solemn and deliberate, sung mostly in the lower registers, as if some sad event in village history is being recounted. Sirens, on track 6, is full of deep electronic tones and a menacing, predatory growl that invites fear and panic – reminding us that primal existence is precarious, full of uncertainty and danger.

Oo Nu Dah, track 2, has a mysterious pulsating in the electronics with a slightly alien feel as a faint voice comes to the top of the texture, chant-like, in a prayer of supplication. The melody becomes layered – perhaps a proto-canon – and it is as if we are witness to the origins of devotional worship. Celestial Ash, the final track, takes this to the collective level in a cloud of quiet whispers as a distant electronic humming sound emerges, building in volume – as if the sun is rising on the assembled. Voices are heard in short phrases and the electronics evoke a dignified alien presence. A melodic recap of the opening is sung – the language sounds vaguely Celtic – and we could be present at the annual gathering at Stonehenge 4000 years ago.

Breadwoman & Other Tales takes us back to a time when life was highly spiritual and lived in the moment. This CD reminds us that our brains are hardwired for the primal life, and we still respond to its ancient rhythms and sensibility.

Breadwoman & Other Tales is available on Amazon and iTunes.

 

 

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troy1595

Beasts

Music by Martin Brody

Collage New Music, David Hoose, conductor

Albany Records CD Troy 1595

On the Albany CD Beasts, Collage New Music, directed by David Hoose, presents three vocal chamber works by Wellesley College professor Martin Brody. In his liner notes, Brody says that each of the pieces provide, “imaginative identification with something or someone outside one’s self as a catalyst of self-transformation.”

In the title work, featuring laser beam accuracy from soprano Elizabeth Keusch, the focus is on animals: the spider, the octopus, deer, mice, and a werewolf. Millenium Sightings uses the apocalyptic writings of 12 century monk Joachim of Fiore as its starting point, interweaving these with works by Abraham Abulafia and Miraji. Accompanied by bell-like timbres, mezzo soprano Janice Felty sings these angularly melismatic settings with strong declamation and a refined sense of tonal shadings. The Tree of Life shows Brody at his most expansive, combining texts by Ovid, James Merrill, John Ashbery, Richard Wilbur, and Robert Lowell. Mezzo soprano Pamela Dellal displays an impressive lower register, superb dynamic control, and unflagging stamina in these demanding settings. Throughout, Collage and Hoose are estimable accompanists, providing space for the vocal line while exploring the various interesting textures Brody has provided for them.

One quibble, for the publishers, not for Brody: many didn’t not allow reprints of their texts in the liner notes booklet. It would seem that this would serve both poets and composers by showing off their collaboration. One wishes publishers wouldn’t be so parsimonious with permissions.

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500x500

Magnificent Magnificat

Arvo Pärt

Aquarius chamber choir, conducted by Marc Michael De Smet

Jade Music

 

This collection of choral music by Estonian composer Arvo Pärt celebrates his eightieth birthday. It is programmed to emphasize his interpretations of Marian texts such as the Magnificat, Nunc Dimittis, and O Antiphons, all of which are central to his choral output. It also includes an excerpt from the totemic Kanon Pokajanen, his largest choral work, as well as shorter excerpts such as The Deer’s Cry and I am the True Vine. (The latter is particularly beautifully performed.)

Aquarius, a group of twenty-four voices, seems “right-sized” for these works, with enough voices to provide the requisite heft and majesty where necessary while still being able to create diaphanous pianissimo passages elsewhere. Conductor Marc Michael De Smet does an exquisite job of shaping phrases, balancing chords, and, a very important consideration in the performance of Pärt, pacing the proceedings. I will be on the lookout for their complete recording of Kanon Pokajanen.

 

 

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