Posts Tagged “Michael Vincent Waller”


Michael Vincent Waller



The South Shore








From XI Records comes The South Shore, a new double CD release by New York-based composer Michael Vincent Waller. Totaling some 138 minutes, The South Shore is the most comprehensive musical statement from Waller to date – his two previous albums of piano music were much less ambitious in scale. With a style that runs to miniatures and other smaller forms, The South Shore features a total of 31 tracks. This new collection includes a number of different instrumental ensembles that greatly add to the possibilities for new colors and texture. This is a definite enhancement and brings an added dimension to Waller’s carefully constructed pieces. Released in latter weeks of a difficult winter, hearing the warm and sunny pieces of this album is like a weekend in the south of France.

With such a profusion of music, here are some observations on selected tracks.

From disk 1, Atmosfera di Tempo, on track 2, is an example of how an ensemble of several instruments – in this case a string quartet – can give a greater sense of intimacy and empathy to the underlying structure. This piece begins with a repeating figure in the violin supported by the cello. The others join in, to create a warm, contented feeling with just a slight tinge of sadness that strings can bring out so well. The theme is repeated with variations, sometimes gentle and lush and at other times more insistent and stark. The subtle shadings and sensitivity evident in this piece are a credit to the four players.

Per La Madre e La Nonne on track 4 features a string trio, with a light, bright sound to open. The violin leads with a repeating melody with an effective counterpoint in the lower strings. Variations follow and the close ensemble adds to the sweet feeling in this piece. Written for the composer’s mother and grandmother, Per La Madre e La Nonne is sturdy enough to carry the emotions invested in it yet delicate enough to clearly render the finer details. Towards the end the cello carries the melody with the others in counterpoint, and this gives a somber, almost brooding feel. The ensemble here -by Pauline Kim-Harris, Daniel Panner and Christine Kim – is excellent.

Pasticcio per meno è piú, track 5, is a solo piano piece played with great sensitivity by Nicholas Horvath. A simple running melody above is supported by warm chords underneath and the feel of this is very impressionistic. The gentle touch on the keyboard nevertheless produces a wonderfully luminous sound and the overall effect is to be transported to a sunny day in the south of France. A variation at 4:00 has a more purposeful color, but Pasticcio per meno è piú concludes by reinstating the softer opening.

Nel Nome di Gesú on track 10 opens with a powerful series of strong, chant-like passages repeated by Christine Kim’s cello. The organ line by Carson Cooman adds an expansive component and the result is a feeling of the monumental combined with a comforting sense of familiarity. It is like sitting in a strange church but feeling as if at home. The second movement of this piece is track 11 and the cello, with darker tones plays the melody below the organ, now registered with a lovely flute sound. There is a plaintive, almost mournful feel to this that is nonetheless very beautiful. Both movements of  Nel Nome di Gesú are well balanced and quietly touching.

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Michael Vincent Waller



Seven Easy Pieces








Seven Easy Pieces is the second EP of solo piano music this year from Michael Vincent Waller, released December 2, 2014. Marija Ilic performs this suite of miniatures as recorded by Lawrence de Martin at the Spectrum Studio in New York, NY.

Track 1 is Miniatures (2014) – III. Return from The Fork and this begins with a series of simple repeating phrases that continue with slight variations over a descending bass line. This breaks into an appealingly complex melody and the contrast with the descending chords gives an open, expansive feel. The playing here is accurate and with a sensitive touch.

Miniatures – II. Vocalise follows and this features a quick, syncopated melody over strong descending chords in the lower register. There is a sense of purposeful activity here, almost dance-like and with a pleasing pace and rhythm.

Miniatures – I.  Golden Fourths is next and has a rapid, agile melody line played over a solid, repeating bass chord progression.  Nicely ornamented in spots –  all crisply rendered – this miniature has an almost Baroque feel.

Track 4 is Miniatures – IV. Couplet and this is in a slower tempo with a more dramatic feel. A nice counterpoint develops that accentuates the darker atmosphere. Nicely complex and developed in last minute with a flowing, liquid feel.

Miniatures – V. Drops of Light follows and begins with single notes in the higher registers, echoed by a single note in low or middle. Now a descending bass line highlights a series of luminescent notes in melody. ‘Drops of Light’ exactly captures the feel of this piece and the playing by Marija Ilic was equally radiant.

Miniatures – VI. Requests is on track 6 and at 40 seconds is the shortest of the miniatures. Requests is a series of light arpeggios that have the feeling a harp glissando. There is a sense of brightness and space to this.

Miniatures – VII. Octagonal Etude is the concluding miniature and opens with a series of strong single notes followed by short silences that allow the harmonics to rise and mix in unsettling combinations. The dissonances present provide a sense of uncertainty in this last piece.

Seven Easy Pieces is the natural follow-on to Five Easy Pieces released earlier this year. This latest release has a somewhat more cohesive feel than its predecessor and manages to owe more to traditional forms while at the same time sounding entirely contemporary. Seven Easy Pieces is another step by Michael Vincent Waller towards new music informed by historical methods.

The mastering was by Cory Allen at Altered Ear, Austin, Texas and the cover art is Untitled, (2014) by Peter Geerts.

Seven Easy Pieces is available for download here.



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Michael_Vincent_Waller_-_Five_Easy_Pieces_-_cover[1]Michael Vincent Waller: Five Easy Pieces


Gumi Shibata and Jenny Q. Chai





Five Easy Pieces is a new CD of solo piano music by composer Michael Vincent Waller. The five tracks in this album are uncluttered and introspective, offering an inviting entry into Waller’s accessible style. The pieces on this CD are cast from familiar materials and played with exemplary care, allowing the listener to fully concentrate on the many emotions and feelings imparted by the music. Gentle and approachable, this is music that inspires both concentration and contemplation.  Gumi Shibata performs on all the tracks save the last, which is played by Jenny Q. Chai.

The first track on the CD is L’anno del Serpente (2013) and this begins with an uncertain, pensive feeling in the melody that is accentuated by a rising bass line. The tempo is deliberate and the texture is effectively fashioned from repeating lines with simple harmonies. The piece proceeds by way of variations on the opening theme with the first variation offering a bit more complexity and a nice counter melody in the bass. At no time does the piece feel rushed but moves along purposefully so that by the second variation it becomes forcefully declarative. The melody transitions to a flowing, forward-moving series of lines and closes with a quiet passage that leaves the listener in a satisfyingly reflective mood.

L’anno del Serpente is followed by Ninna Nanna (2013) and this piece opens with a gentle, questioning feel that is reinforced with a repeating, bell-like melody. The tempo is unhurried and this allows the sonorous intervals in the harmony to fully ring out. A slight syncopation provides a sense of languid motion as the piece progresses. The first variation increases the tempo, adding density with more notes and counterpoint and this provides a nice contrast to the opening section. The second variation returns to the slower pace of the opening and here the repeating tones become almost hypnotic, the harmonies seeming to hang in the air. The final notes at the close hover above like a fine mist.

The next two tracks are titled Per Terry e Morty I and II (2012) and refer to Terry Jennings and Morton Feldman respectively. Part I begins with strong, direct quarter notes in the melody and a repeating line in the bass that produces a sense of searching and uncertainty. A slight tension is introduced as counterpoint moves into the upper registers so that part I seems to close in a question.  Part II has a middle eastern feel right from the beginning, with a simple melody above and strong chords below to form a powerful declarative line. Now counterpoint by way of a repeating figure above leads to a restatement of the opening with the addition of a descending line. Softening, slowing and then a return to tempo that restores the original color, followed by a strong chord at the finish. These two tracks provide an interesting contrast, especially part II with a strong exotic flavor.

The final track of Five Easy Pieces is Acqua Santa (2013) played by Jenny Q. Chai.  Dark, deep notes open and the mysterious feeling is enhanced with a moving line above, alternately accelerating and slowing.  A repeating line emerges, syncopated against the melody which serves to further deepen the mysterious feel. As the piece proceeds a series of solitary notes gather themselves into a halting cluster of full bodied chords, followed by a long arcing line that reestablishes the forward momentum. Finally, a sweet melody appears that accelerates, then slows turning introspective again.  Acqua Santa closes with an abbreviated recall of the mysterious opening.

Five Easy Pieces, like much of Waller’s music, seems to look forward and backward simultaneously. The sounds are recognizable and familiar – especially in an album consisting of solo piano music – but the studied simplicity and use of repeating figures owes much to the vocabulary of late 20th century minimalism. The result is a mixture that should appeal to even the most determined critic of contemporary music.

Five Easy Pieces is available on iTunes here .  More ways to download and listen are here.

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