NYPO Composer-in-residence Magnus LindbergThe New York Times Arts Beat has details about a $10 million dollar gift the New York Philharmonic recently received from equity manager Henry Kravis. A gift earmarked for new music, the money will underwrite composer residencies and commissions for the orchestra.

For those disheartened by the NYPO’s sometimes tepid commitment to new music during the 90s and 00s, this is a welcome sign that things may be changing for the better under the tenure of their new Music Director Alan Gilbert.

Magnus Lindberg will be the orchestra’s Composer-in-residence for the ’09-’10 and ’10-’11 seasons. New York audiences will get to hear four Lindberg works, including two commissioned by the Philharmonic, this season alone.

The question today for Sequenza21 readers: who would you like to see as the Philharmonic’s next Composer-in-residence? In addition, which composers should the orchestra plan to commission in coming years?

7 Responses to “NYPO’s New Music Funding gets a big boost”
  1. I’m gonna go with Kevin Volans and Evan Ziporyn. They are both capable, and I’d like to hear what they come up with…

  2. Peter Mueller says:

    My vote would be for our old friend, and occasional commenter, David Rakowski.

  3. Daniel says:

    not sure i have a specific composer, but i would like to see a complete unknown (even to the new music community) get some money. also hope there is an open call, rather than it being a “pick the best friends of the orchestra” and give it to already very-well established and financially viable composers.

  4. Christian says:

    I second the nomination for Davy. Great idea Peter!

  5. Lisa X says:

    Someone young like Dave Longstrength or Mary Halvorson would be exciting or someone historic but usually excluded like Braxton (if he’d even take it) might be highly productive.

  6. Jeremy says:

    What about some reading sessions being funded as well? Young composers could benefit from the access to a major orchestra, and we all know that it would be beneficial for the orchestra players to encounter what is being written right now. Some of the aforementioned composers are great, but they are already getting commissions and performances. It would be nice if the NYPhil were to cultivate with an ear to the ground; they could easily pave the way for other US orchestras commissioning practices.

  7. Bill says:

    Anthony Braxton would be fantastic, but would they have the guts to choose him?

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